Date   

Re: Losing our companions -- update

linedgroundsquirrels
 

You are helping me heal after her loss as my emotional support companion. When Tiny's mysterious injury resulting in fx'd femur occurred in Jan. 2019, four options (amputation, surgery, PTS on the spot, or allowing a callous to form) were mentioned after her xray.  I spoke with my friend whose bun had his leg amputated at the same clinic, and things didn't go so well.  Tiny and I established a significant bond going forward with the callous option from her closed fx.  Thank you all for your consoling thoughts and advice.  I will make sure a Paypal donation is made to help keep this group going.  

On Thursday, October 22, 2020, 7:56:50 PM CDT, rlkessler <rlkessler@...> wrote:


Julie,

I am so sorry about your loss; Tiny was so special to you. I had a special needs rabbit, and know what you mean about the strong bond that come with having a bun with special needs.  You were blessed to have had Tiny in your life...and she was blessed to have had you in her life.  You gave her such good care..filled with love.  I am sending you wishes for healing, comfort, and peace.


Take care,
Roberta


Re: No-contact thermometer -- update

paulette
 

Hi Chris,

Dido to what Roberta said.
This is a very difficult time for many, please do take care..

Paulette

On Thursday, October 22, 2020, 09:07:35 PM EDT, rlkessler <rlkessler@...> wrote:


Chris,

I am a lurker on here since I lost my bunny in 2011.  I just wanted to say I am so sorry for the difficult year this has been for you; the losses of two friends and the sudden losses of two dear rabbits.  You have always been so kind and helpful to us all, and I am sending you wishes for healing, comfort, and peace.

Please take care,
Roberta


Re: Did not mark my donation

hunhare
 

Thank you!  You will receive a tax receipt shortly.  🙂

Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Jean Silva via groups.io <buns@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 11:45 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Did not mark my donation
 
Sorry to make extra work.  the PayPal transaction 78J990201J162544J was intended for EtherBun







Did not mark my donation

Jean Silva
 

Sorry to make extra work. the PayPal transaction 78J990201J162544J was intended for EtherBun


Re: No-contact thermometer -- update

rlkessler
 

Chris,

I am a lurker on here since I lost my bunny in 2011.  I just wanted to say I am so sorry for the difficult year this has been for you; the losses of two friends and the sudden losses of two dear rabbits.  You have always been so kind and helpful to us all, and I am sending you wishes for healing, comfort, and peace.

Please take care,
Roberta


Re: Losing our companions -- update

rlkessler
 

Julie,

I am so sorry about your loss; Tiny was so special to you. I had a special needs rabbit, and know what you mean about the strong bond that come with having a bun with special needs.  You were blessed to have had Tiny in your life...and she was blessed to have had you in her life.  You gave her such good care..filled with love.  I am sending you wishes for healing, comfort, and peace.


Take care,
Roberta


Re: Forgot to earmark donation for Etherbun

hunhare
 

Absolutely!  Thank you for your generosity.  🙂

Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of wendyandrayzer via groups.io <wendyandrayzer@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 8:51 AM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Forgot to earmark donation for Etherbun
 
I just made a donation to Etherbun but neglected to earmark it as such.  Please see that it gets to Etherbun.

Wendy Andresen


Re: ADMIN: Etherbun, and the cost thereof

paulette
 

Hi Mark,
Please note, I just made donation as instructed to Etherbun via Paypal. Thank you!
Paulette

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 09:15:42 PM EDT, mark via groups.io <mark318318@...> wrote:


Dear Etherbun Community,

As you know, due to negative changes at Yahoo Groups we moved Etherbun to the new platform, Groups.io.
After a year of experience with it, most if not all of us agree that Groups.io is superior to Yahoo in both features and performance.
We don't regret the move at all.

Unfortunately, for a group the size of Etherbun (over 4,400 members as of today), Groups.io is not free.
It is a full-time job for one or more people to write the software, rent and manage the servers, and deal with issues.
This costs money.

Last year, We The Moderators shelled out to make the move possible.
The cost was $110.00 for the group.

Going forward, we think it's fair to ask those who are financially able to help share the cost.
Given the number of active members, it would take relatively few small donations.
Eleven members donating $10 apiece would fund the group for a year.

We realize that some members may not be able to afford to help.
Especially given the events of 2020 - the political turmoil, an unprecedented pandemic and the resulting recession, we know that many people are struggling to pay for things like rent, food, and veterinary care for their buns.
We are not asking, and do not expect, members in such a situation to donate - please do not if it would cause you financial pain.
But if you are able, and use the group on a regular basis, please consider it.
The Moderators will be chipping in.

Our goal this year is the cost of the past year and the coming year's fees - $220.00 in total.

We will run the donation process as follows:
  • The PayPal account of Dana Krempels' (the owner and co-creator of Etherbun) HARE (Houserabbit Adoption Rescue and Education) group will be used to collect the donations, which will then reimburse the moderator who paid the group fee. HARE is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.
  • For the near future (next few... weeks? months?) we will be sending out periodic ADMIN reminder messages.
  • If we reach our goal, we will say so and stop bugging you.
  • Any excess funds for a given year will be saved for the next year.
  • We will inform the group of the results -  the amount raised, how it was used, and amount remaining.
  • Note that due to PayPal fees ($0.30 + 2.2% of the donation), the net amount raised will be slightly less than the amount donated.
To donate:
  • Browse to the HARE donation link, http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/donate.html
  • Click the "PayPal - Donate now" button.
  • You may donate with either your PayPal account, or if you do not have one, a credit card. Enter a dollar amount and click the appropriate button.
  • Delete the text that says "Add special instructions to the seller" and replace it with "Etherbun" (no quotes) so that Dana's accounting minions know what the donation is for.
  • Fill in the rest of the required information.
In the future, we will either repeat this process yearly, or set the group up to automatically send periodic (monthly ? quarterly?) ADMIN messages with reminders about things like the group guidelines, and include a small note asking for donations. We haven't decided yet, but it will depend on our results this year and member's preferences.

If you have any questions, please direct them to Etherbun management, at: main+owner@etherbun.groups.io.
.
Thanks to all the members for being a part of the group.
And of course, the bunnies thank you.

-mark for EBAC


Forgot to earmark donation for Etherbun

wendyandrayzer
 

I just made a donation to Etherbun but neglected to earmark it as such.  Please see that it gets to Etherbun.

Wendy Andresen


ADMIN: Etherbun, and the cost thereof

mark
 

Dear Etherbun Community,

As you know, due to negative changes at Yahoo Groups we moved Etherbun to the new platform, Groups.io.
After a year of experience with it, most if not all of us agree that Groups.io is superior to Yahoo in both features and performance.
We don't regret the move at all.

Unfortunately, for a group the size of Etherbun (over 4,400 members as of today), Groups.io is not free.
It is a full-time job for one or more people to write the software, rent and manage the servers, and deal with issues.
This costs money.

Last year, We The Moderators shelled out to make the move possible.
The cost was $110.00 for the group.

Going forward, we think it's fair to ask those who are financially able to help share the cost.
Given the number of active members, it would take relatively few small donations.
Eleven members donating $10 apiece would fund the group for a year.

We realize that some members may not be able to afford to help.
Especially given the events of 2020 - the political turmoil, an unprecedented pandemic and the resulting recession, we know that many people are struggling to pay for things like rent, food, and veterinary care for their buns.
We are not asking, and do not expect, members in such a situation to donate - please do not if it would cause you financial pain.
But if you are able, and use the group on a regular basis, please consider it.
The Moderators will be chipping in.

Our goal this year is the cost of the past year and the coming year's fees - $220.00 in total.

We will run the donation process as follows:
  • The PayPal account of Dana Krempels' (the owner and co-creator of Etherbun) HARE (Houserabbit Adoption Rescue and Education) group will be used to collect the donations, which will then reimburse the moderator who paid the group fee. HARE is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.
  • For the near future (next few... weeks? months?) we will be sending out periodic ADMIN reminder messages.
  • If we reach our goal, we will say so and stop bugging you.
  • Any excess funds for a given year will be saved for the next year.
  • We will inform the group of the results -  the amount raised, how it was used, and amount remaining.
  • Note that due to PayPal fees ($0.30 + 2.2% of the donation), the net amount raised will be slightly less than the amount donated.
To donate:
  • Browse to the HARE donation link, http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/donate.html
  • Click the "PayPal - Donate now" button.
  • You may donate with either your PayPal account, or if you do not have one, a credit card. Enter a dollar amount and click the appropriate button.
  • Delete the text that says "Add special instructions to the seller" and replace it with "Etherbun" (no quotes) so that Dana's accounting minions know what the donation is for.
  • Fill in the rest of the required information.
In the future, we will either repeat this process yearly, or set the group up to automatically send periodic (monthly ? quarterly?) ADMIN messages with reminders about things like the group guidelines, and include a small note asking for donations. We haven't decided yet, but it will depend on our results this year and member's preferences.

If you have any questions, please direct them to Etherbun management, at: main+owner@etherbun.groups.io.
.
Thanks to all the members for being a part of the group.
And of course, the bunnies thank you.

-mark for EBAC


Shelter Medicine in the Time of COVID-19

Michael Luskin
 



---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Penn Vet <grovessh@...>
Date: Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:19 PM
Subject: Shelter Medicine in the Time of COVID-19
To: <MICHAEL.BENJAMIN.LUSKIN@...>


Live webinar with Penn Vet's Shelter Medicine Team
Penn Alumni - University of Pennsylvania
Shelter Medicine and Community Engagementin the Time of COVID-19

Join us as Penn Vet's Shelter Medicine team reflects on overcoming challenges to improve the health of our animals and our communities.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 284:00 - 5:00 PM (EST)
RSVP
About this Event

This live webinar aims to synthesize perspectives from Penn Vet’s Shelter Medicine team on answering important questions: responding in an emergency; engaging safely with the community; exchanging critical scientific information; and adapting to the present pandemic.

 

Our speakers will be sharing insights on evidence-based medicine and decision making that could contribute to protecting and responding to animal health and welfare challenges in different communities. Strategies that could help animal health systems “rebound”, making them more resilient against similar, future shocks.

Featured Event Speakers
Brittany Watson, VMD, PhD, DACVPM Associate Professor of Shelter Medicine and Community Engagement; Director, Shelter Animal Medicine Program

Chelsea Reinhard, MPH, DVM, DACVPM

Bernice Barbour Assistant Professor of Clinical Shelter Medicine

RSVP above or visit https://bellwethersessions.eventbrite.com to receive the event details. Questions? Contact Brittany Tinsley at bscan@... or 215-746-2421

MORE VIRTUAL EVENTS

Farm of the Future

Wednesdays through November 18.

More Information...

First Tuesday Lecture

A free series for horse owners and enthusiasts.

More Information...

Reducing the Carbon Footprint in Animal Agriculture.

View a recording of Penn Vet's webinar from Climate week. More Information...

The information contained in this e-mail message is intended only for the personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the Office of Development and Alumni Relations immediately by email, and delete the original message. For Information on the Privacy Policy of the University of Pennsylvania please click here.

Penn Vet
3800 Spruce Street,
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If you wish to be removed from this group's mailing list, Unsubscribe


Re: Losing our companions -- update

David L. Fisher
 

To me, the only thing more heartbreaking than losing an animal is not having any animals at all (and I spent 2 years in a living situation where I couldn't have pets, and it was the worst 2 years of my adult life).  I've seen people who truly fight on the front lines just get to a point where they can't take any more, and they leave the rescue community because of the toll it takes on one's heart.

I know I don't have the emotional strength that most true rescuers have - they are the ones who will always be on scene, and if need be, take an animal that hasn't had a good life and unfortunately the only gift they can offer is to put them to sleep.  I admire such people, and I try my best to support them from "behind the scenes" since I know how crushing it is to make that decision between ultimate misery or death for a life that can't be saved.  This led me to coin the phrase "there is no greater joy than ending a life of suffering, without ending a life".  I put that in the public domain so people would stop asking if they could quote me and so they could simply speak it, live it, share it, and help others.

I think in the long run, those who finally walk off the "battlefield" simply preserve the emptiness left in their hearts, not the love that was there.  Children are supposed to outlive their parents, but those with animals are supposed to outlive those animals - and it is heartbreaking.  For all the pain I've incurred from saying goodbye to my little ones, the only thing more painful was being without them entirely.

Dave (and Monty, and Drillbit, and all those I've saved from a distance, as well as all those I've already lost)

I cannot imagine a life without being immersed in those lives.

"There is no greater joy than ending a life of suffering, Without ending a life."





On 10/20/2020 10:00 PM, pack_lisa wrote:
I just wanted to acknowledge all of the wonderful people here in this group that have loved and lost bunnies. I appreciate you all for your loving kindness to these amazing animals! Thank you all for your support when I lost my very first bunny, Pippin, 8 months ago. I have never grieved the loss of a pet or human like I have with my bunny.  Your kindness and encouragement helped me tremendously! I am grateful. What amazes me is that after your losses, you keep going back and taking more bunnies into your care. Not me. When my 2 girls are gone, I'm done. It just hurts too much! You guys are true bunny warriors! You amaze me!

Lisa



From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of linedgroundsquirrels via groups.io <linedgroundsquirrels@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 12:19 PM
To: Chris Norlund <norlund.chris@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Losing our companions -- update
 
Chris,  Dana, and all readers.  I learn so much from this group.   Kindest praises for educating and describing the medical conditions and heart-wrenching losses you are enduring this year, or have in the past.   Huge emotional support is sent your way.  
 
After my spinal compression girl was PTS on September 26th, I've had a difficult time healing.  I hear you on the Covid-19 concerns and curbside vet appts. etc.  I've been seeking for answers as to what I can possibly learn or do better for our remaining sanctuary buns. 
 
The DVM scripted enrofloxacin abx for a pressure sore on her paw.  My girl Tiny had never received enro' in her 12 3/4 yr. lifetime with us.  She crashed overnight. (The DVM said the next day some rabbits "don't do well" on enro'.  I should now just apply SSD cream)  Her meds of Tramadol, Gabapentin for nerve pain relief, and meloxicam, and then 2 abx doses make we wonder why she declined suddenly when a few days prior she was holding steady, eager to eat her preferred greens.  I was constantly monitoring for appetite, attitude, affection.   I requested a CBC/BMP to check kidney function for metacam dosing and her ALT value was 222.   Blood work was done the day before her PTS, after an earlier ALT value of 30 came back end of June.
She also had challenges consuming cecotropes with her splayed leg and mobility concerns.  I wonder if inability to consume cecos for several weeks' time worsened her health?   The DVM felt there was something else going on with Tiny, but was unable to put her finger on what medical condition she was battling?   Tiny was my esa, emotional suppport bun, and the special needs' buns do take a massive chunk of your heart with them.    So I send comfort words, Chris, as you describe the losses you have gone through. Helps us heal when we can talk through our grief and educate fellow bun guardians.
 
A butterfly catheter was inserted in her back leg after the intial drug did not stop Tiny's heart.   The CVT had inserted two catheters in each front paw.  The DVM decided to do a butterfly catheter after Tiny was still breathing.   That whole experience replays in my mind.  Is hard to erase.  Hence, if you have concerns about dehydration in your bun, please insist on a butterfly catheter right away.
 
Please know that I learn from all messages posted in this group.  We need support, and benefit by personal experiences described.  Gentle, healing hugs, Chris.  You generate love to many.   Please be healthy and well and heartbeats on 4 legs or less will absorb your love.   

Kindness always, Julie SB
 


Re: Losing our companions -- update

pack_lisa
 

I just wanted to acknowledge all of the wonderful people here in this group that have loved and lost bunnies. I appreciate you all for your loving kindness to these amazing animals! Thank you all for your support when I lost my very first bunny, Pippin, 8 months ago. I have never grieved the loss of a pet or human like I have with my bunny.  Your kindness and encouragement helped me tremendously! I am grateful. What amazes me is that after your losses, you keep going back and taking more bunnies into your care. Not me. When my 2 girls are gone, I'm done. It just hurts too much! You guys are true bunny warriors! You amaze me!

Lisa



From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of linedgroundsquirrels via groups.io <linedgroundsquirrels@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 12:19 PM
To: Chris Norlund <norlund.chris@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Losing our companions -- update
 
Chris,  Dana, and all readers.  I learn so much from this group.   Kindest praises for educating and describing the medical conditions and heart-wrenching losses you are enduring this year, or have in the past.   Huge emotional support is sent your way.  
 
After my spinal compression girl was PTS on September 26th, I've had a difficult time healing.  I hear you on the Covid-19 concerns and curbside vet appts. etc.  I've been seeking for answers as to what I can possibly learn or do better for our remaining sanctuary buns. 
 
The DVM scripted enrofloxacin abx for a pressure sore on her paw.  My girl Tiny had never received enro' in her 12 3/4 yr. lifetime with us.  She crashed overnight. (The DVM said the next day some rabbits "don't do well" on enro'.  I should now just apply SSD cream)  Her meds of Tramadol, Gabapentin for nerve pain relief, and meloxicam, and then 2 abx doses make we wonder why she declined suddenly when a few days prior she was holding steady, eager to eat her preferred greens.  I was constantly monitoring for appetite, attitude, affection.   I requested a CBC/BMP to check kidney function for metacam dosing and her ALT value was 222.   Blood work was done the day before her PTS, after an earlier ALT value of 30 came back end of June.
She also had challenges consuming cecotropes with her splayed leg and mobility concerns.  I wonder if inability to consume cecos for several weeks' time worsened her health?   The DVM felt there was something else going on with Tiny, but was unable to put her finger on what medical condition she was battling?   Tiny was my esa, emotional suppport bun, and the special needs' buns do take a massive chunk of your heart with them.    So I send comfort words, Chris, as you describe the losses you have gone through. Helps us heal when we can talk through our grief and educate fellow bun guardians.
 
A butterfly catheter was inserted in her back leg after the intial drug did not stop Tiny's heart.   The CVT had inserted two catheters in each front paw.  The DVM decided to do a butterfly catheter after Tiny was still breathing.   That whole experience replays in my mind.  Is hard to erase.  Hence, if you have concerns about dehydration in your bun, please insist on a butterfly catheter right away.
 
Please know that I learn from all messages posted in this group.  We need support, and benefit by personal experiences described.  Gentle, healing hugs, Chris.  You generate love to many.   Please be healthy and well and heartbeats on 4 legs or less will absorb your love.   

Kindness always, Julie SB
 


Losing our companions -- update

linedgroundsquirrels
 

Chris,  Dana, and all readers.  I learn so much from this group.   Kindest praises for educating and describing the medical conditions and heart-wrenching losses you are enduring this year, or have in the past.   Huge emotional support is sent your way.  
 
After my spinal compression girl was PTS on September 26th, I've had a difficult time healing.  I hear you on the Covid-19 concerns and curbside vet appts. etc.  I've been seeking for answers as to what I can possibly learn or do better for our remaining sanctuary buns. 
 
The DVM scripted enrofloxacin abx for a pressure sore on her paw.  My girl Tiny had never received enro' in her 12 3/4 yr. lifetime with us.  She crashed overnight. (The DVM said the next day some rabbits "don't do well" on enro'.  I should now just apply SSD cream)  Her meds of Tramadol, Gabapentin for nerve pain relief, and meloxicam, and then 2 abx doses make we wonder why she declined suddenly when a few days prior she was holding steady, eager to eat her preferred greens.  I was constantly monitoring for appetite, attitude, affection.   I requested a CBC/BMP to check kidney function for metacam dosing and her ALT value was 222.   Blood work was done the day before her PTS, after an earlier ALT value of 30 came back end of June.
She also had challenges consuming cecotropes with her splayed leg and mobility concerns.  I wonder if inability to consume cecos for several weeks' time worsened her health?   The DVM felt there was something else going on with Tiny, but was unable to put her finger on what medical condition she was battling?   Tiny was my esa, emotional suppport bun, and the special needs' buns do take a massive chunk of your heart with them.    So I send comfort words, Chris, as you describe the losses you have gone through. Helps us heal when we can talk through our grief and educate fellow bun guardians.
 
A butterfly catheter was inserted in her back leg after the intial drug did not stop Tiny's heart.   The CVT had inserted two catheters in each front paw.  The DVM decided to do a butterfly catheter after Tiny was still breathing.   That whole experience replays in my mind.  Is hard to erase.  Hence, if you have concerns about dehydration in your bun, please insist on a butterfly catheter right away.
 
Please know that I learn from all messages posted in this group.  We need support, and benefit by personal experiences described.  Gentle, healing hugs, Chris.  You generate love to many.   Please be healthy and well and heartbeats on 4 legs or less will absorb your love.   

Kindness always, Julie SB
 


Re: No-contact thermometer -- update

Chris Norlund
 

My apologies to the Etherbunners!
I hit reply without thinking and didn't intend for that all to go to the list. 
It sounded like I was having a pity- party. 

I need to 'moderate'  myself !!

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020, 8:21 AM Chris Norlund via groups.io <norlund.chris=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks for the update. Thats discouraging. Would be nice and a real game changer for so many rabbit owners. Don't give up yet though.  You may crack the code yet.     Maybe a new type of thermometer will come out that reads through fur. 

Have you tried the base of the ear?
It's very vascular there.  Thats why that is the first place I look to check for flea dirt when I'm doing a wellness assessment on rabbits. The fleas go there for a good meal. 

I just lost 2 of my closest and best ever rabbits within just a couple of months.  And going to a vet for anything serious during Covid is a nightmare for rabbit owners. 
My big beautiful E-lop, Hops, died of probable Pancreatic cancer a couple of months ago. And about 2 wks ago I lost my beloved little Smidgen to a ruptured thymoma, which also came on quickly and without a lot of warning. 
Hops was about 7 and Smidge just turned 9. She was born here.
Both were very healthy appearing and vivacious, and affectionate rabbits.  All of my most special and bonded to me rabbits are leaving me quickly these days. 
I have a lot I could add to the thymoma discussion on EB, but have not the time nor the emotional energy to even try.  When things should be looking up and going better... the dark cloud comes to stay even longer. 2 close friends, and also 2 special rabbits -- all this year.  I just want to run away.  And so much to look forward to with my husband and both of those 2 friends all retiring this year.
 I'm getting paranoid that something catastrophic is next, and am frantic to get Dave to hurry up and retire. We both need to focus on our health and improve our activity and lifestyle. More exercise and work on getting  our weights down-- which is hard to do when we have our commitments and heavy work schedules. But I need him here, his help, and where I can better manage his health (which would help mine too).

2020 is not done with us all yet. I'm hot holding my breath that it's going to get better either. Especially with elections right around the corner. 

So we all hang on!! Do our best, and find the beauty in each day. Love our bunnies and people in our lives, and find joy in what we do have. I find myself trying to start each day with that reminder,  now more than ever. 

I hope you and your bunnies are doing your best too, in spite of  the challenges. 

Kindest regards,
Chris


On Sat, Oct 17, 2020, 9:57 PM motek_and_gozal via groups.io <talsaarony=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I finally bought a no-contact thermometer for Osher. Taking my own temperature, it gave a reading within the normal range, though I didn't have a reliable reading to compare it to. Then I tried Pashosh. She has a few bald spots (due to a mysterious condition), one of which is conveniently located at her nape, where I was told by a vet to take the no-contact readings. Readings there were in the range of 95-98ºF. Pashosh is severely arthritic, but otherwise fine. I tried her cheek, where she has another bald spot, similar readings. Readings where she is furry were even lower and at the ears also low. Next came Osher. Aimed at his forehead, which is quite large, Osher being a big guy, showed only Lo errors. Aimed at the back of his neck, the readings were 91-2ºF. 
Since my own readings were normal, the thermometer is not defective, but while this is anecdotal, this method appears to be unsuitable for rabbits. I am very disappointed and still on a quest to find a way to take big, ornery Osher's temperature...


Re: No-contact thermometer -- update

hunhare
 

I so sorry about the loss of your babies.

🙁


Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Chris Norlund via groups.io <norlund.chris@...>
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 11:21 AM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; Saarony, Tal <talsaarony@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] No-contact thermometer -- update
 
Thanks for the update. Thats discouraging. Would be nice and a real game changer for so many rabbit owners. Don't give up yet though.  You may crack the code yet.     Maybe a new type of thermometer will come out that reads through fur. 

Have you tried the base of the ear?
It's very vascular there.  Thats why that is the first place I look to check for flea dirt when I'm doing a wellness assessment on rabbits. The fleas go there for a good meal. 

I just lost 2 of my closest and best ever rabbits within just a couple of months.  And going to a vet for anything serious during Covid is a nightmare for rabbit owners. 
My big beautiful E-lop, Hops, died of probable Pancreatic cancer a couple of months ago. And about 2 wks ago I lost my beloved little Smidgen to a ruptured thymoma, which also came on quickly and without a lot of warning. 
Hops was about 7 and Smidge just turned 9. She was born here.
Both were very healthy appearing and vivacious, and affectionate rabbits.  All of my most special and bonded to me rabbits are leaving me quickly these days. 
I have a lot I could add to the thymoma discussion on EB, but have not the time nor the emotional energy to even try.  When things should be looking up and going better... the dark cloud comes to stay even longer. 2 close friends, and also 2 special rabbits -- all this year.  I just want to run away.  And so much to look forward to with my husband and both of those 2 friends all retiring this year.
 I'm getting paranoid that something catastrophic is next, and am frantic to get Dave to hurry up and retire. We both need to focus on our health and improve our activity and lifestyle. More exercise and work on getting  our weights down-- which is hard to do when we have our commitments and heavy work schedules. But I need him here, his help, and where I can better manage his health (which would help mine too).

2020 is not done with us all yet. I'm hot holding my breath that it's going to get better either. Especially with elections right around the corner. 

So we all hang on!! Do our best, and find the beauty in each day. Love our bunnies and people in our lives, and find joy in what we do have. I find myself trying to start each day with that reminder,  now more than ever. 

I hope you and your bunnies are doing your best too, in spite of  the challenges. 

Kindest regards,
Chris


On Sat, Oct 17, 2020, 9:57 PM motek_and_gozal via groups.io <talsaarony=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I finally bought a no-contact thermometer for Osher. Taking my own temperature, it gave a reading within the normal range, though I didn't have a reliable reading to compare it to. Then I tried Pashosh. She has a few bald spots (due to a mysterious condition), one of which is conveniently located at her nape, where I was told by a vet to take the no-contact readings. Readings there were in the range of 95-98ºF. Pashosh is severely arthritic, but otherwise fine. I tried her cheek, where she has another bald spot, similar readings. Readings where she is furry were even lower and at the ears also low. Next came Osher. Aimed at his forehead, which is quite large, Osher being a big guy, showed only Lo errors. Aimed at the back of his neck, the readings were 91-2ºF. 
Since my own readings were normal, the thermometer is not defective, but while this is anecdotal, this method appears to be unsuitable for rabbits. I am very disappointed and still on a quest to find a way to take big, ornery Osher's temperature...


Re: No-contact thermometer -- update

Chris Norlund
 

Thanks for the update. Thats discouraging. Would be nice and a real game changer for so many rabbit owners. Don't give up yet though.  You may crack the code yet.     Maybe a new type of thermometer will come out that reads through fur. 

Have you tried the base of the ear?
It's very vascular there.  Thats why that is the first place I look to check for flea dirt when I'm doing a wellness assessment on rabbits. The fleas go there for a good meal. 

I just lost 2 of my closest and best ever rabbits within just a couple of months.  And going to a vet for anything serious during Covid is a nightmare for rabbit owners. 
My big beautiful E-lop, Hops, died of probable Pancreatic cancer a couple of months ago. And about 2 wks ago I lost my beloved little Smidgen to a ruptured thymoma, which also came on quickly and without a lot of warning. 
Hops was about 7 and Smidge just turned 9. She was born here.
Both were very healthy appearing and vivacious, and affectionate rabbits.  All of my most special and bonded to me rabbits are leaving me quickly these days. 
I have a lot I could add to the thymoma discussion on EB, but have not the time nor the emotional energy to even try.  When things should be looking up and going better... the dark cloud comes to stay even longer. 2 close friends, and also 2 special rabbits -- all this year.  I just want to run away.  And so much to look forward to with my husband and both of those 2 friends all retiring this year.
 I'm getting paranoid that something catastrophic is next, and am frantic to get Dave to hurry up and retire. We both need to focus on our health and improve our activity and lifestyle. More exercise and work on getting  our weights down-- which is hard to do when we have our commitments and heavy work schedules. But I need him here, his help, and where I can better manage his health (which would help mine too).

2020 is not done with us all yet. I'm hot holding my breath that it's going to get better either. Especially with elections right around the corner. 

So we all hang on!! Do our best, and find the beauty in each day. Love our bunnies and people in our lives, and find joy in what we do have. I find myself trying to start each day with that reminder,  now more than ever. 

I hope you and your bunnies are doing your best too, in spite of  the challenges. 

Kindest regards,
Chris


On Sat, Oct 17, 2020, 9:57 PM motek_and_gozal via groups.io <talsaarony=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I finally bought a no-contact thermometer for Osher. Taking my own temperature, it gave a reading within the normal range, though I didn't have a reliable reading to compare it to. Then I tried Pashosh. She has a few bald spots (due to a mysterious condition), one of which is conveniently located at her nape, where I was told by a vet to take the no-contact readings. Readings there were in the range of 95-98ºF. Pashosh is severely arthritic, but otherwise fine. I tried her cheek, where she has another bald spot, similar readings. Readings where she is furry were even lower and at the ears also low. Next came Osher. Aimed at his forehead, which is quite large, Osher being a big guy, showed only Lo errors. Aimed at the back of his neck, the readings were 91-2ºF. 
Since my own readings were normal, the thermometer is not defective, but while this is anecdotal, this method appears to be unsuitable for rabbits. I am very disappointed and still on a quest to find a way to take big, ornery Osher's temperature...


No-contact thermometer -- update

motek_and_gozal
 

I finally bought a no-contact thermometer for Osher. Taking my own temperature, it gave a reading within the normal range, though I didn't have a reliable reading to compare it to. Then I tried Pashosh. She has a few bald spots (due to a mysterious condition), one of which is conveniently located at her nape, where I was told by a vet to take the no-contact readings. Readings there were in the range of 95-98ºF. Pashosh is severely arthritic, but otherwise fine. I tried her cheek, where she has another bald spot, similar readings. Readings where she is furry were even lower and at the ears also low. Next came Osher. Aimed at his forehead, which is quite large, Osher being a big guy, showed only Lo errors. Aimed at the back of his neck, the readings were 91-2ºF. 
Since my own readings were normal, the thermometer is not defective, but while this is anecdotal, this method appears to be unsuitable for rabbits. I am very disappointed and still on a quest to find a way to take big, ornery Osher's temperature...


Re: Decreased appetite and lethargy on antibiotics?

bpbhoo
 

maybe the bacteria dying due to the antibiotics is causing the upset? i hope she will improve soon. i agree, watch her closely. sha


Re: Thymoma - asking for information

bunnylv109 <beata_payerhin@...>
 

Thanks so much Cindy, this is very helpful!  I agree, there is not much to lose at this point. 

Beata


From: Cindy Fisher <clfisher17@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 8:49 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beata_payerhin@... <beata_payerhin@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Thymoma - asking for information
 
Hi, Beata!

He was 8-1/2 years old when he was diagnosed; he was just a little over 10 years old when he passed away. I don’t recall how large the thymoma was, but I remember the vet saying that it was fairly large when she discovered it on x-ray. I didn’t see any visible side effects from the prednisolone (just remembered it was prednisolone, not prednisone that he was given) other than the shrinkage of the thymoma. I know that long-term treatment can have side effects down the road, but I figured he wouldn’t live for very long without it, so it made sense to put him on it.

Cindy

On Oct 7, 2020, at 4:58 PM, bunnylv109 <beata_payerhin@...> wrote:

Hi Cindy,

Thanks so much for sharing your experience.  That is an encouraging information!  May I ask how old your bunny was when he was diagnosed with thymoma?  Also, do you know how early it was caught?  Unfortunately, according to his vet, Yogi's mass is pretty big, filling most of his chest cavity.  He had no symptoms earlier (except for some noises that he was making sometimes when he was in a hen position that I never thought much about but now attribute them to the growing mass) and it was an incidental finding while addressing his GI issue.  He had x-rays done before but I guess the mass was not visible or it was not caught. 
Did you notice any side effects from prednisone?

Thanks again for this helpful information!

Beata

From: Cindy Fisher <clfisher17@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 7:16 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beata_payerhin@... <beata_payerhin@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Thymoma - asking for information
 
Hi, Beata!

I had a rabbit several years ago that was diagnosed with a thymoma. I had noticed the nictating membrane on both eyes was frequently visible and took him in thinking it was an eye infection. While he was there, the vet noted he was also having a little trouble breathing when he was put on his back. X-rays confirmed a mass in the upper thoracic. I had noticed several months earlier that he seemed to have a large dewlap for a male, but I didn’t think much of it at the time. The vet told me that thymomas come in two flavors - lymphocytic and nonlymphocytic. One responds to prednisone, the other doesn't. My rabbit was put on prednisone twice a day for 10 days and once a day thereafter. Fortunately, his thymoma was the type that responded. His eyes and breathing were back to normal within days. He was on prednisone for the remainder of his life, and he lived 1-1/2 years after his diagnosis. I suspect that he passed away from some sort of cancer; he slowly lost weight and lost the ability to lose his back legs despite eating normal quantities of food the last year of his life.

One of the other volunteers I work with at my local animal shelter also had a rabbit diagnosed with a thymoma that was put on prednisone. He lived for three years after diagnosis and passed away from other causes.

Cindy

On Oct 7, 2020, at 2:53 PM, bunnylv109 <beata_payerhin@...> wrote:

My beloved 11 year old bunny Yogi has been diagnosed with possible thymoma two months ago.  It was an absolutely devastating news and I had very difficult time dealing with it.  I decided to not go the chemotherapy or radiation route at his advanced age but I am now considering steroids. He has been doing OK for the past two months since his diagnosis but 2 days ago I noticed that when he is grooming and his body is twisted to one side, his right eye becomes more pronounced, almost bulging but when he straightens his body it looks fine again, maybe it's just a little bit bigger. I called his exotic vet right away to discuss our options so that he doesn't suffer unnecessarily and he suggested starting steroids (which he considers an alternative to euthanasia). 
I heard very different stories about steroid use in bunnies so I was wondering if those of you who had the misfortune of going through that could share your experiences with using steroids for thymoma, whether it was helpful and if there were any side effects. I’m really not ready to say goodbye to Yogi yet but not knowing how quickly it will be progressing, I don’t want to put him in a situation when he will be suffocating and not able to breathe so it would be really helpful if you could also share your experiences with the speed of progression of that illness, whether it progresses really quickly and one day I might find him unable to breathe or whether it will be slowly getting worse and worse and I will be able to catch it in time and decide when it is time to put him to sleep :(  
I know his time with us is very limited but I want to do what is best for him during that time so I would appreciate it if you could share your experiences and help me make the decision that would serve him the best.  

Thank you very much,

Beata and Yogi




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