Date   

Re: low calcium veg for bladder stone bunny

paulette
 

Hi Julie,

I have a New Zealand White, a big inactive couch potato:). So I do worry about sludge or stones....so far no issues. "Knock on wood"
I do not limit his calcium but try to offer a balanced diet. I think hydration is VERY important in cases like this. To ensure my boy is well hydrated, I offer plenty of wet leafy greens, at least 5 varieties daily. I always include plenty of romaine lettuce and/or green lettuce for it's high water content, and cilantro which is his favorite. I'll include a higher calcium nutritious green such as baby arugula, or kale etc, alternate dandelion greens ( natural diuretic ) with parsley, and include a lower calcium greens such as escarole, chicory, bok choy, etc.  I try to follow what Dr. Susan Brown suggests in her wonderful article...


Should avoid alfalfa hay!

This is another excellent article on the subject of.... 


Bloody urine after bladder flush

angela95010@gmail.com
 

My bun just went through his first ever bladder flush procedure for a bad case of sludge. I was told that I could expect to see bloody urine. Does anyone have any experience with how long this can last after the procedure? Hours? Days? Weeks?


Re: low calcium veg for bladder stone bunny

JG
 

Hi Emma.

Thank you for your insights / info.   Tokki is probably more on the chilled side.  He is free range, but he does spend a lot of time sitting in various beloved boxes.  He prob got more exercise lately because I’ve been chasing him around to give him metacam.  ha ha.  He has two water dishes, but I don’t think he drinks a ton… I rarely see either him or his bunwife drinking, but the level goes down, and they are both peeing.  I put a little apple juice into the water to encourage drinking more, as I read that several places.

This has been the year for bunny problems.. I feel like I’m keeping the local specialist vet economy afloat.  :)  I miss my years in the UK as pet insurance was waaaaayyyy better there for rabbits.  here it doesn’t seem worth having.

Julie



On 22 Dec 2020, at 18:37, Emprins <emprins@...> wrote:

Hey Julie!

It's my understanding that bladder sludge is now considered to be an issue of exercise and water intake.  The current thinking is that calcium gets shaken up in the bladder through exercise and that this allows it to dissolve and be excreted without an issue. Stones are created out of those deposits that aren't dissolved and excreted. This is also seen as the reason older bunnies are much more prone to sludge- they often move around much less than their younger counterparts. 

Is your buddy a lazy boy or a spastic zoom bunny? Has he been getting the space he needs to get his exercise in?  How does he get his water (bowl or bottle?) and how much water does he drink? Making sure veggies are soaking wet when you serve them is a great way to increase water uptake and help him excrete more calcium. Bonus: our buns always have to groom in the middle of eating to keep their mouths from getting too wet! Adorable!

This is still just the current theory so take it with a grain of salt. They've had a hard time pinning down the cause of bladder sludge, although I will say that a lot of bunny people have said that cutting back on calcium rich veggies doesn't help much. Our vet suggests trying to rotate out calcium rich veggies but like you said, a lot of bunny favorites are high in calcium and Vets, like doctors, are not always up to date on the newest thinking/research, so we don't worry too much about limiting calcium. We find that quality of life is much higher with a wide array of veggies, but we have young free roaming bunnies with no history of bladder sludge so your milage may vary in terms of how cautious you want to be. 

Sending my best to you and your mini rex boy! Bunny health issues can be stressful, scary, and expensive, so I hope you and your little bud have been recovering well. Your love for him is clear and I hope you can find the right lifestyle tweaks to keep him sludge-free! 

Happy Holidays!
Emma



On Dec 22, 2020 at 6:53 PM, <Kinenchen> wrote:

Accumulation of crystals in the form of sludge or stones is not usually a dietary issue, but rather a metabolic one. Has your vet prescribed something like magnesium and/or citrate to help change the pH of your bunny's urine so that the stones start to dissolve? These can be VERY effective for reducing sludge and preventing new stones forming. Bacteria can also change the pH of your bunny's urine that can contribute to the formation of sludge and stones. Did your vet check your bunny's urine for signs of infection?

http://www.medirabbit.com/Safe_medication/LiquidMg/Liquid_magnesium.htm


Christie Taylor



On Tue, Dec 22, 2020 at 5:55 PM JG via groups.io <bramblebunny=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello.

My 4 YO mini rex has bladder stones.  He had the majority of them flushed out today, and I want to do everything possible to make sure they don’t return, if I can.  I have looked around for various listings of low calcium veg, which are fairly similar, with the exception of arugula, which on some lists is low and some is high.  I am also slightly confused about oxalic acid… as some veg are low in calcium but high in oxalic acid… not sure what that means for bunny health?

A very good knowledgable bunny friend also said that there are schools of thought now that the calcium from veggies is not a huge consideration  in the likely formation of bladder stones, so there is no need to especially limit certain veg  (of course all the ones that he likes best are the high ones… kale, parsley, collard greens…. and is meh on lower ones like romaine and other lettuces, though cilantro/coriander seems to be one that he likes that is lower in calcium.

I would be grateful for any experience / current thinking / research on what or what not to feed regarding green stuff.   he gets about 1tsp of Oxbow timothy adult pellets a day, plus hay and veg  (hay with very low to no alfalfa from local farmer, as the hay I was buying… from rabbit hole hay has gone up 30%!!!)

THanks.

Julie Glover






Re: low calcium veg for bladder stone bunny

Emprins
 

Hey Julie!

It's my understanding that bladder sludge is now considered to be an issue of exercise and water intake.  The current thinking is that calcium gets shaken up in the bladder through exercise and that this allows it to dissolve and be excreted without an issue. Stones are created out of those deposits that aren't dissolved and excreted. This is also seen as the reason older bunnies are much more prone to sludge- they often move around much less than their younger counterparts. 

Is your buddy a lazy boy or a spastic zoom bunny? Has he been getting the space he needs to get his exercise in?  How does he get his water (bowl or bottle?) and how much water does he drink? Making sure veggies are soaking wet when you serve them is a great way to increase water uptake and help him excrete more calcium. Bonus: our buns always have to groom in the middle of eating to keep their mouths from getting too wet! Adorable!

This is still just the current theory so take it with a grain of salt. They've had a hard time pinning down the cause of bladder sludge, although I will say that a lot of bunny people have said that cutting back on calcium rich veggies doesn't help much. Our vet suggests trying to rotate out calcium rich veggies but like you said, a lot of bunny favorites are high in calcium and Vets, like doctors, are not always up to date on the newest thinking/research, so we don't worry too much about limiting calcium. We find that quality of life is much higher with a wide array of veggies, but we have young free roaming bunnies with no history of bladder sludge so your milage may vary in terms of how cautious you want to be. 

Sending my best to you and your mini rex boy! Bunny health issues can be stressful, scary, and expensive, so I hope you and your little bud have been recovering well. Your love for him is clear and I hope you can find the right lifestyle tweaks to keep him sludge-free! 

Happy Holidays!
Emma



On Dec 22, 2020 at 6:53 PM, <Kinenchen> wrote:

Accumulation of crystals in the form of sludge or stones is not usually a dietary issue, but rather a metabolic one. Has your vet prescribed something like magnesium and/or citrate to help change the pH of your bunny's urine so that the stones start to dissolve? These can be VERY effective for reducing sludge and preventing new stones forming. Bacteria can also change the pH of your bunny's urine that can contribute to the formation of sludge and stones. Did your vet check your bunny's urine for signs of infection?

http://www.medirabbit.com/Safe_medication/LiquidMg/Liquid_magnesium.htm


Christie Taylor



On Tue, Dec 22, 2020 at 5:55 PM JG via groups.io <bramblebunny=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello.

My 4 YO mini rex has bladder stones.  He had the majority of them flushed out today, and I want to do everything possible to make sure they don’t return, if I can.  I have looked around for various listings of low calcium veg, which are fairly similar, with the exception of arugula, which on some lists is low and some is high.  I am also slightly confused about oxalic acid… as some veg are low in calcium but high in oxalic acid… not sure what that means for bunny health?

A very good knowledgable bunny friend also said that there are schools of thought now that the calcium from veggies is not a huge consideration  in the likely formation of bladder stones, so there is no need to especially limit certain veg  (of course all the ones that he likes best are the high ones… kale, parsley, collard greens…. and is meh on lower ones like romaine and other lettuces, though cilantro/coriander seems to be one that he likes that is lower in calcium.

I would be grateful for any experience / current thinking / research on what or what not to feed regarding green stuff.   he gets about 1tsp of Oxbow timothy adult pellets a day, plus hay and veg  (hay with very low to no alfalfa from local farmer, as the hay I was buying… from rabbit hole hay has gone up 30%!!!)

THanks.

Julie Glover



Re: low calcium veg for bladder stone bunny

Kinenchen
 

Accumulation of crystals in the form of sludge or stones is not usually a dietary issue, but rather a metabolic one. Has your vet prescribed something like magnesium and/or citrate to help change the pH of your bunny's urine so that the stones start to dissolve? These can be VERY effective for reducing sludge and preventing new stones forming. Bacteria can also change the pH of your bunny's urine that can contribute to the formation of sludge and stones. Did your vet check your bunny's urine for signs of infection?

http://www.medirabbit.com/Safe_medication/LiquidMg/Liquid_magnesium.htm


Christie Taylor



On Tue, Dec 22, 2020 at 5:55 PM JG via groups.io <bramblebunny=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello.

My 4 YO mini rex has bladder stones.  He had the majority of them flushed out today, and I want to do everything possible to make sure they don’t return, if I can.  I have looked around for various listings of low calcium veg, which are fairly similar, with the exception of arugula, which on some lists is low and some is high.  I am also slightly confused about oxalic acid… as some veg are low in calcium but high in oxalic acid… not sure what that means for bunny health?

A very good knowledgable bunny friend also said that there are schools of thought now that the calcium from veggies is not a huge consideration  in the likely formation of bladder stones, so there is no need to especially limit certain veg  (of course all the ones that he likes best are the high ones… kale, parsley, collard greens…. and is meh on lower ones like romaine and other lettuces, though cilantro/coriander seems to be one that he likes that is lower in calcium.

I would be grateful for any experience / current thinking / research on what or what not to feed regarding green stuff.   he gets about 1tsp of Oxbow timothy adult pellets a day, plus hay and veg  (hay with very low to no alfalfa from local farmer, as the hay I was buying… from rabbit hole hay has gone up 30%!!!)

THanks.

Julie Glover



low calcium veg for bladder stone bunny

JG
 

Hello.

My 4 YO mini rex has bladder stones.  He had the majority of them flushed out today, and I want to do everything possible to make sure they don’t return, if I can.  I have looked around for various listings of low calcium veg, which are fairly similar, with the exception of arugula, which on some lists is low and some is high.  I am also slightly confused about oxalic acid… as some veg are low in calcium but high in oxalic acid… not sure what that means for bunny health?

A very good knowledgable bunny friend also said that there are schools of thought now that the calcium from veggies is not a huge consideration  in the likely formation of bladder stones, so there is no need to especially limit certain veg  (of course all the ones that he likes best are the high ones… kale, parsley, collard greens…. and is meh on lower ones like romaine and other lettuces, though cilantro/coriander seems to be one that he likes that is lower in calcium.

I would be grateful for any experience / current thinking / research on what or what not to feed regarding green stuff.   he gets about 1tsp of Oxbow timothy adult pellets a day, plus hay and veg  (hay with very low to no alfalfa from local farmer, as the hay I was buying… from rabbit hole hay has gone up 30%!!!)

THanks.

Julie Glover



Re: Bladder stone/cataract surgery

bpbhoo
 

i just saw this. i am so glad frodo was able to get some of his vision back.  if need be, you can always retrofit his environment to stop him from bumping into hard surfaces. eg by using corrugated cardboard, bubble wrap, cushions, foam padding etc.  poor fella. my rip bun percy also had a cataract that came on suddenly and he only had one eye so his vision was very limited. i had to announce myself when approaching him. anyways, good luck with everything!  sha


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Alison McFarland
 

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Re: Material to Put In a Digging Box

donnadwood@...
 

My girls' digging box is full of knotted socks.  They love it. Dig, toss, bury. They sometimes use it as a litter box, but that's the beauty of the socks.  Throw 'em in the wash.


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

wendyandrayzer
 

I probably get a lot of criticism for this, but a shedding blade has always been my grooming tool of choice.  I have to take my bunnies outside and put them on a table because huge clouds of fur come out.  Just be gentle, of course, and never brush their ears or the bottoms of the feet.  My bunnies always seem to enjoy it.


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

pack_lisa
 

David - this is good advice! Also, we have to consider there are different types of fur and different shedding types. Some rabbits pluck easily (Jersey Wooly), others don't (English angora). Some rabbits shed 24/7. Others blow their coats. I've seen it all. So the best de-shedding technique varies from rabbit-to-rabbit. 
Lisa


From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2020 9:11 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; gabbysbunnies@... <gabbysbunnies@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur
 

I had a mini Rex and found the best way to groom him was by plucking his fur and not using a brush.  He came to accept it and appreciate the help.  My technique was to pluck with one hand and pet/scratch with the other so he didn't get annoyed (and Noffy was easily annoyed).

Dave


On 11/14/2020 6:32 PM, gabbysbunnies via groups.io wrote:
I've found that a flea comb works really well.  It isn't very long and is easy to maneuver.  

Good luck!
Gabrielle LaManna
Educator, New Fairfield, CT

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, 02:55:38 PM EST, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Sometimes for really diaphanous fluff instead of comb or brush the nubby textured silicone glove works well, and my rabbits love the gentle massaging feel.  That said though, on my crew it's only useful after I've combed out the big stuff, then use the glove to swipe off the loosened light residue still floating on the surface.  Try a simple rubber glove to get the idea before investing in a specialized tool, see what you think.

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

David L. Fisher
 

I had a mini Rex and found the best way to groom him was by plucking his fur and not using a brush.  He came to accept it and appreciate the help.  My technique was to pluck with one hand and pet/scratch with the other so he didn't get annoyed (and Noffy was easily annoyed).

Dave


On 11/14/2020 6:32 PM, gabbysbunnies via groups.io wrote:
I've found that a flea comb works really well.  It isn't very long and is easy to maneuver.  

Good luck!
Gabrielle LaManna
Educator, New Fairfield, CT

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, 02:55:38 PM EST, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Sometimes for really diaphanous fluff instead of comb or brush the nubby textured silicone glove works well, and my rabbits love the gentle massaging feel.  That said though, on my crew it's only useful after I've combed out the big stuff, then use the glove to swipe off the loosened light residue still floating on the surface.  Try a simple rubber glove to get the idea before investing in a specialized tool, see what you think.

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

pack_lisa
 

My favorite is the FURminator for small pets. It gets rid of a LOT of loose fur! Nothing else compares!


From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of gabbysbunnies via groups.io <gabbysbunnies@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2020 6:32 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur
 
I've found that a flea comb works really well.  It isn't very long and is easy to maneuver.  

Good luck!
Gabrielle LaManna
Educator, New Fairfield, CT

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, 02:55:38 PM EST, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Sometimes for really diaphanous fluff instead of comb or brush the nubby textured silicone glove works well, and my rabbits love the gentle massaging feel.  That said though, on my crew it's only useful after I've combed out the big stuff, then use the glove to swipe off the loosened light residue still floating on the surface.  Try a simple rubber glove to get the idea before investing in a specialized tool, see what you think.

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

gabbysbunnies
 

I've found that a flea comb works really well.  It isn't very long and is easy to maneuver.  

Good luck!
Gabrielle LaManna
Educator, New Fairfield, CT

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, 02:55:38 PM EST, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Sometimes for really diaphanous fluff instead of comb or brush the nubby textured silicone glove works well, and my rabbits love the gentle massaging feel.  That said though, on my crew it's only useful after I've combed out the big stuff, then use the glove to swipe off the loosened light residue still floating on the surface.  Try a simple rubber glove to get the idea before investing in a specialized tool, see what you think.

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

BenBun'sMom
 

Sometimes for really diaphanous fluff instead of comb or brush the nubby textured silicone glove works well, and my rabbits love the gentle massaging feel.  That said though, on my crew it's only useful after I've combed out the big stuff, then use the glove to swipe off the loosened light residue still floating on the surface.  Try a simple rubber glove to get the idea before investing in a specialized tool, see what you think.


On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

Emprins
 

We use the Hair Buster (https://store.binkybunny.com/mobile/hairbuster-p116.aspx ) and love it. We have a Flemmie mix with short soft rollback fur and a very fluffy holland lop with a lot of very fine long fur and it works well for both! Since our buns both really hate being brushed - very jealous of all the people whose buns seem to love their brushies - we’ve tried a number of different brushes, including several slicker brushes and brushing gloves and they aren’t nearly as effective as the hair buster.  I have spent 2 hours a day for the past 3 days brushing my molting babies and I have no idea how I would have gotten all that hair off with a slicker brush! 



On Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM, <Mary via groups.io> wrote:

Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

CatherineAnderson
 

I have a bunny with similar fur and found that back brushing him works best.  I wasn't able to find any combs or brushes that worked either.

On Sat, Nov 14, 2020 at 12:11 PM Mary via groups.io <mmcneilly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Rabbit Brush/Comb for Fine Fur

Mary
 

Hello
Please can anyone recommend a brush or comb for a rabbit with fine fur? One of my rabbits has short hair and moults a lot. His fur is very fine and without any tangles. I have tried various brushes and combs without much success. The best one was a metal comb for pets but it did not get much of the loose fur out. I usually just stroke him and get as much of the fur off as possible. 
Thank you. Mary


Re: Material to Put In a Digging Box

Kinenchen
 

I like crumpled brown paper. My bunnies methodically shred it by tearing off little strips and it's much easier to clean up than I expected. I usually just fill a big cardboard box that I've wiped down and removed all the stickers from. I cut a few holes in the sides and then I throw it away (with the mess inside) when they're done.


Christie Taylor



On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 11:19 PM pack_lisa <lisajpack@...> wrote:
I've made digging boxes using organic potting soil, sand, and pea gravel. I used an XL storage container and cut 2 holes in it. If you have the space, a plastic kiddie pool is even better. Yes, you'll need to prewash the pea gravel. It's a real chore. It was my least favorite substrate. If your floors are carpeted, I don't recommend pea gravel. They DO kick it out just as much as dirt or sand. Dirt gets super dry and the rabbits had black feet from it. Sand is my favorite. It is easy to clean up and the rabbits track it less that dirt. They also seemed to prefer the sand, honestly. I hated cleaning up the kicked out gravel. Plus it is difficult to wash. All 3 options are good. Just give it a go. You'll find the one that works best for you.

From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Diane Reyniers <d.j.reyniers@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 9:04 AM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; christinejcox@... <christinejcox@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Material to Put In a Digging Box
 
I wouldn't use any sort of gravel, could hurt hocks. I wouldn't fancy walking barefoot on gravel... 
The mess can be contained quite well IF you use a large, tall box. If bunny has trouble jumping in, you could put a platform next to it. 
Diane

From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Christine J. Cox via groups.io <christinejcox=comcast.net@groups.io>
Sent: 12 November 2020 13:58
To: Mary <mmcneilly@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Material to Put In a Digging Box
 
I have not actually done this yet myself, although I have plans to at some point:  I read about filling a digging box with pea stone, small rounded pebbles.  You would want to rinse it well first, as it is usually covered in stone dust, but I loved the idea of this because it's certainly cleaner and easier to pick up than dirt or sand.  Plus there is less concern about contaminants or insects present in sand or stone.  I also hoped it would help file my guy's nails down!  You can get a bag at a garden center fairly inexpensively.  The person who recommended this said he used an enclosed box, such as a transparent plastic storage box.  He cut a hole in one side 4-5" from the bottom so the stone would stay contained.  Personally, I would want to keep the cover off, as I would want better airflow, but it sounds like a great containment system.

Good luck with it, hopefully I will be inspired to put one together this winter!
Christine


Re: Material to Put In a Digging Box

pack_lisa
 

I've made digging boxes using organic potting soil, sand, and pea gravel. I used an XL storage container and cut 2 holes in it. If you have the space, a plastic kiddie pool is even better. Yes, you'll need to prewash the pea gravel. It's a real chore. It was my least favorite substrate. If your floors are carpeted, I don't recommend pea gravel. They DO kick it out just as much as dirt or sand. Dirt gets super dry and the rabbits had black feet from it. Sand is my favorite. It is easy to clean up and the rabbits track it less that dirt. They also seemed to prefer the sand, honestly. I hated cleaning up the kicked out gravel. Plus it is difficult to wash. All 3 options are good. Just give it a go. You'll find the one that works best for you.


From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Diane Reyniers <d.j.reyniers@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 9:04 AM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; christinejcox@... <christinejcox@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Material to Put In a Digging Box
 
I wouldn't use any sort of gravel, could hurt hocks. I wouldn't fancy walking barefoot on gravel... 
The mess can be contained quite well IF you use a large, tall box. If bunny has trouble jumping in, you could put a platform next to it. 
Diane

From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of Christine J. Cox via groups.io <christinejcox@...>
Sent: 12 November 2020 13:58
To: Mary <mmcneilly@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Material to Put In a Digging Box
 
I have not actually done this yet myself, although I have plans to at some point:  I read about filling a digging box with pea stone, small rounded pebbles.  You would want to rinse it well first, as it is usually covered in stone dust, but I loved the idea of this because it's certainly cleaner and easier to pick up than dirt or sand.  Plus there is less concern about contaminants or insects present in sand or stone.  I also hoped it would help file my guy's nails down!  You can get a bag at a garden center fairly inexpensively.  The person who recommended this said he used an enclosed box, such as a transparent plastic storage box.  He cut a hole in one side 4-5" from the bottom so the stone would stay contained.  Personally, I would want to keep the cover off, as I would want better airflow, but it sounds like a great containment system.

Good luck with it, hopefully I will be inspired to put one together this winter!
Christine

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