Date   

Re: Sneezing bunny

BenBun'sMom
 

Could be something as simple as a bit of foreign matter from hay (seed, grain hull fragment, for instance) lodged in her nares.  Sneezing might expel any such debris, but the vet can see.  Vet can also listen to her respiratory sounds, determine if anything seems to be brewing in there.


On Thu, Mar 4, 2021 at 1:23 PM jeberly via groups.io <jeberly=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello, 


My Rex bunny, Hopscotch recently started having  episodes of sneezing.   She will sneeze about 10 times in a row and then that is the end of it.   I am not seeing any eye or nose discharge and she is eating well and active as always.    I have a vet appointment on Monday to have her check out by the vet who sees rabbits in my area but is not a specialist.  

 I have two questions, anyone know of a "rabbit savy" vet in the Berks Co. or Lebanon Co areas of PA?     My second questions is any thoughts what the sneezing could be all about, nothing has changed in her environment so I would not think it would be any type of allergy but I suppose an allergy could develop as she is getting older (7 years).    My mini lop, Popcorn is doing fine and is not sneezing or showing any signs.     

Thanks,

Jean Eberly and bunnies


Sneezing bunny

jeberly@...
 

Hello, 


My Rex bunny, Hopscotch recently started having  episodes of sneezing.   She will sneeze about 10 times in a row and then that is the end of it.   I am not seeing any eye or nose discharge and she is eating well and active as always.    I have a vet appointment on Monday to have her check out by the vet who sees rabbits in my area but is not a specialist.  

 I have two questions, anyone know of a "rabbit savy" vet in the Berks Co. or Lebanon Co areas of PA?     My second questions is any thoughts what the sneezing could be all about, nothing has changed in her environment so I would not think it would be any type of allergy but I suppose an allergy could develop as she is getting older (7 years).    My mini lop, Popcorn is doing fine and is not sneezing or showing any signs.     

Thanks,

Jean Eberly and bunnies


Re: Tufts of hair on lop’s feet?

Ellen
 

My Miss Bean had these same tuffts.....a mini lop as well! I believe she may have had a little bit of a hip splay, as she hopped a little differently than other rabbits, kicking her feet a bit to the outside with each hop. I thought that her "fuffers", as I called 'em, were the result of the fur being pushed in that particular direction from her slightly odd foot motion...but who knows?!


Re: Tufts of hair on lop’s feet?

Cindy Fisher
 

My first Holland lop had the same thing, but the fur ended up becoming mats - each of her back feet looked like she had an extra toe! I was able to remove them by gently combing them out by pinching the mat between two fingers to keep my work on the mat from tugging on her foot, then slowly combing from the end of the mat toward my pinched fingers. It took a few sessions, but I was finally able to get rid of them.

Cindy

On Mar 4, 2021, at 2:39 AM, kristy <needlegrrl@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello!

We have a lop (Piper) that is about two years old. In the past four months or so, she has developed these thick tufts of hair that stick out to the sides of her feet. It almost looks like a tuft of fur that she is shedding, but I have lightly tugged on them, and they are not coming loose.

They don’t seem to bother her at all, and she just seems to have one on the side of each of her feet.

Has anyone experienced this? None of my other bunnies have had this, but they are all different breeds.

Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper







Re: Tufts of hair on lop’s feet?

 

I had to reply because my Holland lop had the same exact thing!!! Except his would come out if you tried gently tugging on them. Always on the sides of his fluffy feet. If they don’t feel like they’re gonna come out I’d just leave them. 


Tufts of hair on lop’s feet?

kristy
 

Hello!

We have a lop (Piper) that is about two years old. In the past four months or so, she has developed these thick tufts of hair that stick out to the sides of her feet. It almost looks like a tuft of fur that she is shedding, but I have lightly tugged on them, and they are not coming loose.

They don’t seem to bother her at all, and she just seems to have one on the side of each of her feet.

Has anyone experienced this? None of my other bunnies have had this, but they are all different breeds.

Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper


Re: Adequan, Myristol

Catherine Wilson
 

Hi- I use adequan for all 3 of mine. They have responded very well and still hop up and down stairs with ease at 10 years old. I give the injection under the “tent” area every 4 days.


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy

David L. Fisher
 

I've seen that statistic cited in many places, but for all we know we're all just repeating someone's estimate.  I agree - we don't need to be numerically accurate to validate the warning that intact females are at high risk for reproductive cancer.

After all, 82% of all people know with 76% certainty that 91% of all statistics are 68% inaccurate.  :)

The only number I'm sure of is, I want to be as close to 100% sure that Monty is okay and not suffering quietly.

Dave



On 2/28/2021 5:08 PM, Krempels, Dana M wrote:
Yeah, but where did SHE get that figure?  Does she cite a study?

I get the feeling that somewhere back in time, someone pulled that figure out of their lower intestine, and we've been citing it ever since.

Unless we can cite an actual study, I would not use actual numbers.  Just stick to the "high risk" and all will be well.  🙂

Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 5:06 PM
To: Krempels, Dana M <dana@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

The original number I encountered was actually a 6 out of 7 chance, which translates to about 85% (technically, 85.714285 repeating) and I'm not entirely sure where I first saw that figure, so...  According to "Rabbit Health in the 21st Century (2nd Edition)" by Kathy Smith, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high incidence of ovarian or uterine cancer - as high as 80-90% by age three" (from page 32) - I think that's the most authoritative assertion as far as the bunny community is concerned.

I have a feeling another vet visit will be in order anyway, as Monty's eating is not normal - she IS eating, but only a small amount of hay, certain greens (and a couple raisins) - no grapes, no pellets, and generally not as voracious as I like to see.  I'll have blood tests done at that time to prepare for a spay.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 4:07 PM, Krempels, Dana M wrote:
We've all hear the 85% chance of developing uterine cancer by age three for bunnies.  A few years back, some of us thought it would be a good idea to find the source of that number, since the House Rabbit Society had been citing it, too.

And we could not find any source at all for that figure. 

It could be correct.  But it also could be way off.  We just don't know.

After we discovered there was no real source for the 85% number, we just started saying, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high risk of developing uterine cancer, even  as young as the age of three."

Just to make sure we're being accurate.  Science!  🙂


Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher via groups.io <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:55 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 
CAUTION: This email originated from outside the organization. DO NOT CLICK ON LINKS or OPEN ATTACHMENTS unless you know and trust the sender.

Actually, it was my understanding that unspayed females have an 85% chance of developing reproductive cancer by age 3, and Monty is at least twice that age.

I'm currently more concerned about her appetite, which seems to be affected by some gas - I've tried giving simethicone a couple times, and it seems to have reducred the amount of gurgling, but she's still acting a little off.  She may be going back to the vet sooner than we think if that doesn't improve.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 9:59 AM, Rebecca Rose wrote:
I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy

hunhare
 

Yeah, but where did SHE get that figure?  Does she cite a study?

I get the feeling that somewhere back in time, someone pulled that figure out of their lower intestine, and we've been citing it ever since.

Unless we can cite an actual study, I would not use actual numbers.  Just stick to the "high risk" and all will be well.  🙂

Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 5:06 PM
To: Krempels, Dana M <dana@...>; main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

The original number I encountered was actually a 6 out of 7 chance, which translates to about 85% (technically, 85.714285 repeating) and I'm not entirely sure where I first saw that figure, so...  According to "Rabbit Health in the 21st Century (2nd Edition)" by Kathy Smith, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high incidence of ovarian or uterine cancer - as high as 80-90% by age three" (from page 32) - I think that's the most authoritative assertion as far as the bunny community is concerned.

I have a feeling another vet visit will be in order anyway, as Monty's eating is not normal - she IS eating, but only a small amount of hay, certain greens (and a couple raisins) - no grapes, no pellets, and generally not as voracious as I like to see.  I'll have blood tests done at that time to prepare for a spay.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 4:07 PM, Krempels, Dana M wrote:
We've all hear the 85% chance of developing uterine cancer by age three for bunnies.  A few years back, some of us thought it would be a good idea to find the source of that number, since the House Rabbit Society had been citing it, too.

And we could not find any source at all for that figure. 

It could be correct.  But it also could be way off.  We just don't know.

After we discovered there was no real source for the 85% number, we just started saying, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high risk of developing uterine cancer, even  as young as the age of three."

Just to make sure we're being accurate.  Science!  🙂


Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher via groups.io <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:55 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 
CAUTION: This email originated from outside the organization. DO NOT CLICK ON LINKS or OPEN ATTACHMENTS unless you know and trust the sender.

Actually, it was my understanding that unspayed females have an 85% chance of developing reproductive cancer by age 3, and Monty is at least twice that age.

I'm currently more concerned about her appetite, which seems to be affected by some gas - I've tried giving simethicone a couple times, and it seems to have reducred the amount of gurgling, but she's still acting a little off.  She may be going back to the vet sooner than we think if that doesn't improve.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 9:59 AM, Rebecca Rose wrote:
I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy

David L. Fisher
 

The original number I encountered was actually a 6 out of 7 chance, which translates to about 85% (technically, 85.714285 repeating) and I'm not entirely sure where I first saw that figure, so...  According to "Rabbit Health in the 21st Century (2nd Edition)" by Kathy Smith, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high incidence of ovarian or uterine cancer - as high as 80-90% by age three" (from page 32) - I think that's the most authoritative assertion as far as the bunny community is concerned.

I have a feeling another vet visit will be in order anyway, as Monty's eating is not normal - she IS eating, but only a small amount of hay, certain greens (and a couple raisins) - no grapes, no pellets, and generally not as voracious as I like to see.  I'll have blood tests done at that time to prepare for a spay.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 4:07 PM, Krempels, Dana M wrote:
We've all hear the 85% chance of developing uterine cancer by age three for bunnies.  A few years back, some of us thought it would be a good idea to find the source of that number, since the House Rabbit Society had been citing it, too.

And we could not find any source at all for that figure. 

It could be correct.  But it also could be way off.  We just don't know.

After we discovered there was no real source for the 85% number, we just started saying, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high risk of developing uterine cancer, even  as young as the age of three."

Just to make sure we're being accurate.  Science!  🙂


Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher via groups.io <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:55 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 
CAUTION: This email originated from outside the organization. DO NOT CLICK ON LINKS or OPEN ATTACHMENTS unless you know and trust the sender.

Actually, it was my understanding that unspayed females have an 85% chance of developing reproductive cancer by age 3, and Monty is at least twice that age.

I'm currently more concerned about her appetite, which seems to be affected by some gas - I've tried giving simethicone a couple times, and it seems to have reducred the amount of gurgling, but she's still acting a little off.  She may be going back to the vet sooner than we think if that doesn't improve.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 9:59 AM, Rebecca Rose wrote:
I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy

hunhare
 

We've all hear the 85% chance of developing uterine cancer by age three for bunnies.  A few years back, some of us thought it would be a good idea to find the source of that number, since the House Rabbit Society had been citing it, too.

And we could not find any source at all for that figure. 

It could be correct.  But it also could be way off.  We just don't know.

After we discovered there was no real source for the 85% number, we just started saying, "Unspayed female rabbits have a very high risk of developing uterine cancer, even  as young as the age of three."

Just to make sure we're being accurate.  Science!  🙂


Dana

Dana Krempels, PhD

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biology

University of Miami




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher via groups.io <dlf@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:55 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; beckyatthebeach@... <beckyatthebeach@...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 
CAUTION: This email originated from outside the organization. DO NOT CLICK ON LINKS or OPEN ATTACHMENTS unless you know and trust the sender.

Actually, it was my understanding that unspayed females have an 85% chance of developing reproductive cancer by age 3, and Monty is at least twice that age.

I'm currently more concerned about her appetite, which seems to be affected by some gas - I've tried giving simethicone a couple times, and it seems to have reducred the amount of gurgling, but she's still acting a little off.  She may be going back to the vet sooner than we think if that doesn't improve.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 9:59 AM, Rebecca Rose wrote:
I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: Treatment for Ear Infection?

David L. Fisher
 

Domestic rabbits do NOT belong roaming around outside.  Your neighbor sounds like they might be trying to get rid of the bunnies this way.  I would call the local humane society and report this as a neglect/cruelty/abandonment case, and enlist their help in capturing these poor souls before the worst happens. 

Dave


On 2/27/2021 5:23 PM, thompson@... wrote:
Hello bunny-lovers, I have two beautiful buns who stay inside the house. My neighbor has two bunnies that she lets roam around the neighborhood : (  I noticed that one of the bunnies has a HUGE infection in his ear - the whole ear is filled. It is so sad. I would like to help this bunny but I don't know what to do? Thank you so much for any ideas.
Best,
Ellen
mom of Cinnabun and Clive


Re: Treatment for Ear Infection?

Chris Norlund
 

I've been loosely following this thread,  so i may have missed some details. However what is strikingly obvious to me is that rabbits that need to get urgent vet care and are NOT, is neglect and/or abandonment  (may be criminal neglect in some jurisdictions). 
AND  rabbits that are running loose having to fend for themselves are NOT  'owned', but are considered strays. 
If this was my neighborhood,  i would lure those rabbits to my yard with a daily source of food/ water/ shelter, and capture them. Inconspicuously proceeding,  and taking them to a rabbit rescue ( or shelter that proactively spays/ neuters/adopts).

Every day that those rabbits are loose being strays they are on borrowed time,  awaiting a tragedy. 

If you need help capturing them,  talk to your local rabbit rescues for assistance.  Often one of us will even loan traps or come out to help. If you can't find anyone local,  I would even consult with you by phone and give you instructuons that would help you develop a plan that fits your situation. 

If something happens to those rabbits and you could have done something-- it will haunt you forever.  
You're not breaking any laws by capturing  strays.

If you are concerned about former owner finding out, make sure the rabbits go to a rescue and not a public shelter. A rescue will watch your back. However its doubtful former owners would even care or notice the rabbits are gone  anyway. 

Good luck!!
Chris

Ps. Where are you located? Need help finding a rescue group near you? PM me. 

On Sat, Feb 27, 2021, 10:46 PM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
Hi Ellen,
   That is so sad for those poor bunnies and must be really difficult for you to witness.

     Letting bunnies run around loose is considered Animal Abandonment in NYS.  I have helped a few bunnies by bringing that to the peoples’ attention.
      In 2 cases, the people wanted to relinquish the bunnies.  In every case, it led to an initial conflict as people usually think it’s fine and they become defensive.



If you can talk with the people, perhaps you could at least nicely say that you noticed the ear issue ... and that you have some medication which works great for not only ear mites (which it sounds like), but fleas.

  Revolution 1x a month for 2 months should clear up the mites, if that’s what the problem is.   Both bunnies should be treated.

     Wishing for the best outcome for the sweet bunnies💗🐰🐰
 Sincerely,
      Meg

     
      

On Feb 27, 2021, at 9:01 PM, thompson@... wrote:

Hello bunny-lovers, I have two beautiful buns who stay inside the house. My neighbor has two bunnies that she lets roam around the neighborhood : (  I noticed that one of the bunnies has a HUGE infection in his ear - the whole ear is filled. It is so sad. I would like to help this bunny but I don't know what to do? Thank you so much for any ideas.
Best,
Ellen
mom of Cinnabun and Clive


Re: Monty is NOT a good boy

David L. Fisher
 

Actually, it was my understanding that unspayed females have an 85% chance of developing reproductive cancer by age 3, and Monty is at least twice that age.

I'm currently more concerned about her appetite, which seems to be affected by some gas - I've tried giving simethicone a couple times, and it seems to have reducred the amount of gurgling, but she's still acting a little off.  She may be going back to the vet sooner than we think if that doesn't improve.

Dave




On 2/28/2021 9:59 AM, Rebecca Rose wrote:
I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: Adequan, Myristol

BenBun'sMom
 

Pippi is doing well with acupuncture (and aquapuncture, B12 injected at certain needling sites).  Just considering adjuncts to give her the best support we can, home care between acu sessions.  BTW hand needles are helpful on sensitive rabbits, a great improvement over conventional sizes.


On Sun, Feb 28, 2021 at 1:15 PM Mara <kabukibun@...> wrote:
Hi,

I tried Myristol for several months and it didn’t help my Flemish Giant at all. Others may have had different experiences.

I haven’t used Adequan. 

I had some success with acupuncture.


On Feb 28, 2021, at 12:10 PM, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Ten y/o Pippi has developing OA through hips, knees, hocks, and one therapeutic her vet mentioned is Adequan.  Used that years ago, then disc'd when it was in short supply.  Is Adequan still considered favorable, effective, safe, with rabbits?  Is it preferably given IM or SC -- some articles suggest it may be less effective SC (?)

Anyone still fond of Myristol as an adjunct therapeutic in OA situations?  Thanks.



Re: Treatment for Ear Infection?

Ellen Thompson
 

Hello Meg,

Thank you so much for your advice and information. Wish me luck!

Best,
Ellen


Re: Adequan, Myristol

Mara Hurwitt & Sam Cox
 

Hi,

I tried Myristol for several months and it didn’t help my Flemish Giant at all. Others may have had different experiences.

I haven’t used Adequan. 

I had some success with acupuncture.


On Feb 28, 2021, at 12:10 PM, BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:


Ten y/o Pippi has developing OA through hips, knees, hocks, and one therapeutic her vet mentioned is Adequan.  Used that years ago, then disc'd when it was in short supply.  Is Adequan still considered favorable, effective, safe, with rabbits?  Is it preferably given IM or SC -- some articles suggest it may be less effective SC (?)

Anyone still fond of Myristol as an adjunct therapeutic in OA situations?  Thanks.



Adequan, Myristol

BenBun'sMom
 

Ten y/o Pippi has developing OA through hips, knees, hocks, and one therapeutic her vet mentioned is Adequan.  Used that years ago, then disc'd when it was in short supply.  Is Adequan still considered favorable, effective, safe, with rabbits?  Is it preferably given IM or SC -- some articles suggest it may be less effective SC (?)

Anyone still fond of Myristol as an adjunct therapeutic in OA situations?  Thanks.



Re: Monty is NOT a good boy

Rebecca Rose
 

I realized, sadly, after I made the remark about not neutering my first bunny (rescued when he was 10+) that I was STILL thinking of Monty as a boy!  My apologies, sweet Monty.

I, too, would lean toward spaying her now.  Similar to many of you, I once rescued 2 girls together (not sisters, but bonded) - as is often the case, their history was pretty much unknown - but they were likely between 4 and 5 years old.  After I'd gotten them settled in and examined for other issues, I went ahead and had them both spayed.  The vet actually called me, mid-surgery on one, to ask if she could possibly be pregnant (me:  NO!!), because she had a large mass in her uterus.  Vet removed it (I believe there were smaller areas of concern as well), and that bun is now between 8 and 9 y.o. and still doing great.  Although all of our experiences are "anecdotal", together they seem to indicate a strong likelihood of an unspayed female developing reproductive cancer in "middle age"- and actual statistics seem to bear this out too.

-Becky-




From: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io> on behalf of David L. Fisher <dlf@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 4:03 PM
To: main@etherbun.groups.io <main@etherbun.groups.io>; bustercharlie@... <bustercharlie@...>; karen@... <karen@...>
Subject: Re: [Etherbun Main] Monty is NOT a good boy
 

Well, I must admit - I was not intending on having Monty spayed at this point (not wanting to introduce any new stress) but the cancer issue has been on my mind.  My first bunny, Q-Tip, was never neutered (my vet and I chose not to put him through the st4ess and risk) and he lived happily enough, but I have no idea what killed him (no necropsy) or whether being intact had anything to do with it.  Sigh.

Now I'm giving serious consideration to having a spay done, just to be sure she's okay now and in the future.  I've had older bunnies that were fixed later in life before I adopted them, so I have a lot to think about.

Dave


On 2/26/2021 10:43 AM, Meg Brown wrote:
  I agree with Chris snd Karen.   My Rosie was almost 6 when she was spayed and found to have uterine cancer.   It did not spread.    Rosie lived a wonderful life, (Chris, you will remember her from my FB posts)
    She passed peacefully at home at 13.5 years old.   She was paraplegic during her last year, but so alert and loving.  My cat, Cowboy, loved being near her as well.

     Bella was found to have ovarian cancer when she was spayed as an elder.  
Our very skilled vet removed the tumors.  Bella lived for another 5 years and passed from kidney disease.

    I rescued a ten yo male with obvious testicular cancer.   He was neutered and recovered beautifully.

With all of these elder buns (and others over 5 yo), my vet and I agreed to go forward with their surgeries.   Their bloodwork was WNL.   We felt that the risk of cancer and other issues like pyometra was too great.
      
I always enjoy hearing about your sweet Monty🐰💓
   Sincerely,
     Meg

On Feb 26, 2021, at 10:25 AM, christofur2 <karen@...> wrote:

I totally agree with Chris.   It is not too late to have her spayed.   We do not know the ages of most of the rabbits coming into the rescue and many of them are mature females.   As long as they are otherwise healthy, do not hesitate to spay.   One older female,  although nothing abnormal was found during the spay,  developed mammary cancer a few years later.   Luckily it was caught early and removed,  but if we decided not to spay her,  she would have had a very different outcome. 
Karen


Re: Treatment for Ear Infection?

Meg Brown
 

Hi Ellen,
   That is so sad for those poor bunnies and must be really difficult for you to witness.

     Letting bunnies run around loose is considered Animal Abandonment in NYS.  I have helped a few bunnies by bringing that to the peoples’ attention.
      In 2 cases, the people wanted to relinquish the bunnies.  In every case, it led to an initial conflict as people usually think it’s fine and they become defensive.



If you can talk with the people, perhaps you could at least nicely say that you noticed the ear issue ... and that you have some medication which works great for not only ear mites (which it sounds like), but fleas.

  Revolution 1x a month for 2 months should clear up the mites, if that’s what the problem is.   Both bunnies should be treated.

     Wishing for the best outcome for the sweet bunnies💗🐰🐰
 Sincerely,
      Meg

     
      

On Feb 27, 2021, at 9:01 PM, thompson@... wrote:

Hello bunny-lovers, I have two beautiful buns who stay inside the house. My neighbor has two bunnies that she lets roam around the neighborhood : (  I noticed that one of the bunnies has a HUGE infection in his ear - the whole ear is filled. It is so sad. I would like to help this bunny but I don't know what to do? Thank you so much for any ideas.
Best,
Ellen
mom of Cinnabun and Clive

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