Date   

Re: Help!!! ..Epileptic Seisures ? or???

Erica Cavin <ecavin@...>
 

On Fri, 7 Apr 2000 K911Rescue@aol.com wrote:

I do rabbit rescue and have two buns that have seizures. My vet says that
trying phenobarb (sp?) is not a good option with rabbits - that you may kill
them trying to treat them.
Amanda (e. cuniculi-positive, symptomatic bunny) has been on phenobarbitol
since last fall. She was having multiple seizures several times a day.
We started with a very low dose and brought her in regularly for blood
tests to check the level of the medicine. Amanda has had no problems from
the medicine and it has reduced the number and severity of the seizures.
I know that there is at least one other bunny at this practice being
treated with phenobarbitol.

Do you have any more information about the dangers of phenobarbitol?

I've had good luck going with herbal remedies. I've been giving them a few
drops of "lobelia essence" each day.
I would also be very interested in learning more about lobelia essence.

On the subject of alternative remedies, "Homeopathic First Aid for
Animals" by Walker mentions using Rescue Remedy to help bring an animal
out of a seizure.

Erica


Yard Sale

camelote@...
 

Hi Everyone....

Hope everyone is staying cool and collected with this heatwave!

Just FYI - we're finally getting around to the yard sale thing!...
This Saturday (Sept 23rd) is Cupertino's citywide yard sale...
Ours will be from 8a-2p (I think...) and will feature everything
from bikes to art stuff... (Pastel pencils, watercolors, paper, light
tables... You name it!) Let me know if there is a particular type of art
supply you're looking for... I'm probably getting rid of it!

Hope everything is going well for you!

Joy


new to buns...need advice

Devon Hancock <guitargirl@...>
 

Hi all! I've been thinking about adopting a bun for some time now and I have done a lot of research on the web includidng joining this group. The time has come that I am ready to adopt a bun, but I am still having a difficult time deciding between breeds and male or female. I think I would prefer a smaller bun, the easier to litterbox train the better. Could someone please give advice on a good breed for beginners (if it matters?), and male vs. female for beginners? I would really appreciate the advice. I want to make sure that I am completely prepared for this bunny. It's my responsibility.

Thanks,
Devon


Re: new to buns...need advice

Devon Hancock <guitargirl@...>
 

Thank you all so much for all the advice. I did actually go to a local pet store yesterday (looking for aquarium supplies) and noticed they had buns. When I told the owner that I had been thinking about getting a bun she immefiately started trying to push me into buying a bunny. She overwhelmed me making me a deal on a cage and everything and then she decided for me (without asking me) that I would get a female jersey bunny that a local woman breeds and raises! I quickly stated that I would have to talk to my dad because he holds the money (semi-true) and that I would have to get back to her. I decided right then that I wasn't going to get a bunny there. I went today and looked at a local feed store and I am going to call around to some other feed stores tomorrow. I'm not sure what kind of shelters and rescues we have around here. I'm fairly positive that we don't have a Housebunny society. I'm not even sure that we have a humane society. I live in rural Oklahoma. I know of one rescue that deals with dogs and cats, but I don't know if they deal with buns. I'm going to work on finding that out tomorrow. Over the next few weeks I will probaly bombard you with questions, but I am so thankful to have such a plethora of bunny knowledge available right at my fingertips.

Thank again!!!
Devon
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Re: new to buns...need advice

Devon Hancock <guitargirl@...>
 

I'm located in the Southeast part of Oklahoma. Kind of near McAlester.
That's really the best I can do. This part of Oklahoma is mostly a bunch
of
small towns that nobody has ever heard of. McAlester isn't too far from
Tulsa or Muskogee and about 2 hrs from the Arkansas border. If anybody in
this area could help, I would sure appreciate it.
Thanks,
Devon
----- Original Message -----
From: klintji1 <klintji1@comcast.net>
To: Devon Hancock <guitargirl@intellex.com>
Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2003 12:42 PM
Subject: Re: [EtherBun] new to buns...need advice


Oops Devon. Sorry I just sent you a blank email by accident! Maybe
you should post to EB saying what general area you are in. Someone can
probably guide you to a source for a rescue. Are the 4-H clubs around?
Someone a while back also said they sometimes give away (a form of
dumping) their less than show quality buns. :( Good for you not
letting that pet store person rush you into a purchase, no matter how
appealing the buns are. Susan


New and bewildered, HELP! (sorry, long cross-post)

Limegirl <awalley@...>
 

Hello!

I just recently joined the list, and I also just recently adopted a rabbit. He hasn't told me his name yet, so for now we'll call him Bunny.

We first found Bunny at a pet store where he was being cared for. His previous owners had left him on their door step, so the people at the pet store were caring for him and looking for a new home for him. I wasn't really looking for a new addition to my household, but Bunny's bold and affectionate personality changed my mind. I felt he needed a good home where he would get lots of love and attention, and I knew my boyfriend and I could give him that.

We brought him home last Wednesday (Sept. 13) and made a spot for him and his cage in our apartment. We gave him a chance to settle in, but it wasn't long before he was showing signs that he wanted to come out and have a look around. We made sure to bunny-proof everything, and he came out of his cage to investigate the place. He was very bold and very relaxed, and he made our cat's acquaintance (under our close supervision) with ease.

I let him out in the morning and the evening on the following days, and he began to show his charming and bold personality. We had to make preparations for moving out, as we will be moving to a larger place. As a result, we took Bunny to go stay at my friend's house.

On Saturday (Sept. 16), we took him over to my friend's house. We set up his cage and I left the top of his cage off so he could come out and have a look around. Once again, he seemed bold and relaxed, and it didn't take long before he was happily stretched out in the middle of the living room floor while we watched a movie.

Everything seemed to be going well, and he seemed to relish affection from everyone, including my friend. He seemed to enjoy stretching out and having people stroke him liberally.

On Sunday night, my friend came home to find that Bunny had toppled his water dish. She let him out, and proceeded to clean up his cage for him. As she was bent over cleaning, he charged at her and bit her on the butt! She was shocked, and did her best to finish cleaning quickly and put him back.

When she went to check on him the next morning, he had toppled his water dish again. This time he decided to fully express his disgust by kicking litter at her throught the cage. She got some oven mitts (which he bit her through) and took him out and tried to clean his cage again. Once again, he charged her, and ended up chasing her onto the spare bed nearby. She couldn't catch him to put him in his cage, so she had to leave him out until she returned in the evening.

Does anyone know why this has happened? I'm totally confused. We cleaned his cage several times while he was out in our apartment, and he was never aggressive in any way. I try to minimize the amount I pick him up, but when I have to, he is very cooperative. He was also very cooperative at the pet store.

I wanted to make Bunny's life better, but I feel like I've made it worse. It would be such a shame to bring him home and find that he hates everyone now and wants to chase us around the house.

Help! How can I make it up to Bunny and build the bond I'd hoped we eventually would?

Anne


No Subject

K Cowern <kcowern@...>
 

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more on NIC cages

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

Can you provide an updated supplier for NIC? Target sells a similar
modular unit, but the Neat Idea Cubes aren't available here at retail
and may not be widely available elsewhere.



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frontline

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

There have been good articles on VeterinaryPartners.com by Susan
Brown and others on the dangers of Frontline, although I understand
that Dr. Brown is retired and no longer sees patients. I believe I
found some good tutorials through NetVet, which has an almost
real-time vet consulting service. A couple of vets have told me that
a half dose of Frontline may be safe--and I know that at least one of
my rabbits was treated that way before he came to me--but I wouldn't
take that chance. Supposedly Revolution and Advantage are relatively
safe. One of mine was treated with Advantage by someone else during a
hurricane evacuation when I had to let another rescue care for
everyone. Various HRS educators have endorsed Advantage and
Revolution, but I've read dissenting opinions on this..

Pyrethrin powders (Adams used to make one, but it's hard to find)
have worked well for my flea-afflicted rabbits, but permethrins are a
different story--DEADLY. Sevin dust is also reputed to be effective
and safe at concentrations of less than 5%, but I have no direct
experience with it.

Diligent flea combing can help a lot. One of my silver guys is a flea
magnet. If there's a single flea in the house, it will find him.
White animals have been reported to attract more fleas, but that
seems to vary with the individual.



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taking temps

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

I also agree that it may be important to use body temp as a warning
sign, but I don't do this myself because the possibility that the
bunny will squirm when only one person is trying to get the
temperature and get hurt isn't worth the risk. If the temp seems
abnormal and the rabbit is behaving strangely, I'm going to let the
vet handle the problem anyway.

Most other routine tasks are a two-person or three-handed job for
anyone who has even a minor disability or vision problems. Even
though the NYC HRS guidelines for trimming nails are supposed to be
easy on the rabbit and the trimmer, for example, I can't trim nails
by myself, and that technique is best when one person holds and the
other trims.

It would really help if the original poster of the good method of
taking temps could post some photos at the EB web site. I found some
of the instructions a little confusing.


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hangers

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

The vet perspective on dissolving hairballs seems to vary a bit
depending on how well they keep up--at least among the
non-rabbit-savvy vets available to me. One of my vets recommends
papaya, but some knowledgeable owners here and elsewhere say it
doesn't really help even though in theory it contains enzymes that
should help dissolve the proteins in the hair. That advice may be
based on somewhat obsolete information. Another vet told me just a
couple of weeks ago that she has seen some good reports on the
effectiveness of pineapple juice, although a bunny expert I know
disagrees that canned juice works as well as fresh. Pineapple also
contains substances that help to break down protein--for example,
gelatin will not congeal in pineapple juice because it contains a
substance that interferes with the formation of protein structures
that make Jell-o jell.

The traditional advice during a heavy shed has been to make sure the
rabbit is getting enough fiber, but in my (limited) experience it's
equally important to be sure they're well hydrated. If you see
crumbly poops, it seems to make sense that they are not absorbing
enough fluid, maybe because of a developing hairball. I think I've
probably averted a couple of serious problems by giving extra
lactated Ringer's and encouraging them to drink more when a rabbit is
shedding and seems to be eating less and not feeling well.

Now you can contribute to nonprofit organizations such as the House
Rabbit Society by using Google's nonprofit portal whenever you search the web.

Please help the House Rabbit Society (and many other charities and
advocacy groups) by performing your web searches through
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myxomatosis

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

I've read several alarming reports--perhaps unconfirmed by
authorities--that the myxomatosis infection rate in the UK is
expected to reach 95% and that some are predicting a loss of most of
the rabbit population there. Can anyone confirm or refute that?

Myxomatosis has been an intermittent problem here and is thought to
be a future risk here in Florida for the next few years because of
the drastic disruption of insect life cycles from all the recent
hurricanes. We have a huge mosquito problem that insecticide can't
begin to address because of vast areas of standing water from
hurricane damage. For that reason I strongly discourage everyone from
putting rabbits outside under any circumstances. I don't adopt to
anyone who might let a rabbit outside where it could be exposed. T.he
same is apparently happening in some areas of California that have
large areas of disturbed marshes and wetlands


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Nov. 2005 article on myxo in the UK

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

The very useful and alarming UK Independent article on the current
myxo outbreak in the UK can now be found at this URL, which gives
permission for fair use at any educational web site:

http://rense.com/general69/ranb.htm

Now you can contribute to nonprofit organizations such as the House
Rabbit Society by using Google's nonprofit portal whenever you search the web.

Please help the House Rabbit Society (and many other charities and
advocacy groups) by performing your web searches through
<http://www.searchforgood.net>http://www.searchforgood.net.

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inexpensive good hay

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

Pine Hill Farms, which is the bunnybale.com operation, will give a
big break on the cost of bulk hay to rescues and shelters. I'm paying
about $1 a pound including shipping for 25-lb. boxes of good
first-cut timothy. Just tell them when you place the order that
you're a rescue. The owner is very sympathetic. Their second cutting
is probably OK for babies and ailing rabbits.

I used to be in the hay business. Forage hay for horses can vary
enormously in quality, and I've given up trying to find anyone who
produces consistently good grass hay around here that's suitable for
rabbits. Personally I probably wouldn't use barn sweepings unless you
really trust the producer and are confident the hay was cured and
stored correctly. Mold and fungi can be almost impossible to detect,
and if there's any chance the hay was ever exposed to moisture or has
been sitting on the ground, you're taking a real risk in feeding it
to rabbits.

APD and Oxbow are ridiculously overpriced, in my opinion, and there
are other more reasonably priced and excellent products for the small
animal market.


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tucker's teeth and extraction

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

I know of a bunny here who needs his incisors filed down every couple of weeks, and so far the owner has managed to do it for quite a while using a Dremel tool, but like you she is weighing the wisdom of just extracting the incisors. We're lucky to have a veterinary dentist an hour away who also trained as a human dental hygienist. He has proposed something different to manage Murphy's problem. If you would like to consult this dentist by phone or arrange a consult for your own vet, Murphy's mom reports that he is providing his services free because she drives so far. Sounds like a good guy who might help you over the phone.

Rabbit teeth have really long roots, so apparently extraction can be a little tricky. In researching this for her, though, I saw mostly positive reports of the outcome. The key is to get specialty care if you have that option.

Please e-mail me privately if you'd like to get some input from Murphy's mom or their vet.

Cameron


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Re: cages

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

A cautionary note about the NIC cages: they are not all that stable
or structurally sound if you go vertical. Unless they're reinforced
with some kind of frame, they won't support the weight of a large
rabbit.. I don't use them because I don't think they're safe for a
large rabbit who likes to jump from one story to the next. I had one
weaken from the constant stress and partially collapse even though it
had framing. Fortunately the resident was a little startled but wasn't hurt.

I have ten bunnies of varying sizes. The cheapest and best housing
I've found is the Bargain Hound large dog crate, the discount line
carried by Petsmart that they say is made by Midwest, which also
carries a higher-priced line that has two doors. I paid about $50 for
a 36" x 24" crate. They have sturdy doors, are collapsible and easy
to dismantle, and have a very tough bottom pan that is easy to clean.
Wal-Mart sells a similar dog crate for about $55. I have a huge Great
Dane crate for my very active bunny which was about $100.

The eight-panelled 3' zinc-plated puppy exercise pens at Petsmart are
a little less than $60. Office chair mats make great floors for
these and are too thick for a rabbit to chew or dig into, and a few
rag rugs scattered on top are easy to just shake out and launder when
it's time to clean.

I house and exercise ten rabbits inside with supplies bought at
retail for a total of about $600. You could probably find used dog
crates online, but the shipping charges can be steep.



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taking temps

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

I also agree that it may be important to use body temp as a warning
sign, but I don't do this myself because the possibility that the
bunny will squirm when only one person is trying to get the
temperature and get hurt isn't worth the risk. If the temp seems
abnormal and the rabbit is behaving strangely, I'm going to let the
vet handle the problem anyway.

Most other routine tasks are a two-person or three-handed job for
anyone who has even a minor disability or vision problems. Even
though the NYC HRS guidelines for trimming nails are supposed to be
easy on the rabbit and the trimmer, for example, I can't trim nails
by myself, and that technique is best when one person holds and the
other trims.

It would really help if the original poster of the good method of
taking temps could post some photos at the EB web site. I found some
of the instructions a little confusing.

----------



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more on current myxo in the UK

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

This other article at the rabbitwelfare site appears to have been updated last month:

http://www.rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rwf/articles/understanding_myxo.htm


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weather in FL

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

I'm in the FL panhandle, and my buns live indoors, but maybe our experience will make some sense. Rabbits do very well in cool temperatures. Like horses, they get frisky in cool temps and really seem to enjoy being cool. They are highly susceptible to both heat stress and dehydration, however, so if you think they will be subject to temp above 75 degrees, please be sure they have a way to get out of direct sunlight and get plenty of fresh water. Mine enjoy having ceramic tiles to lie on ($1 each at Home Depot) when it gets a little muggy even inside.

During numerous power outages during hurricanes this past year and a half, I was frantic with worry because in the absence of A/C, temps in my house approached 90 degrees. It was clear that these animals were in real distress. Please don't underestimate the danger of letting a rabbit get too warm. At one point a couple were extremely lethargic, and if a wonderful benefactor hadn't lent me a generator, I'm sure that they would all have been in real, perhaps life-threatening trouble in another day or so. With no gasoline and no functioning veterinary practices, there would have been no help available for them.

Another danger of housing them outdoors--besides the obvious danger of predators who can tear apart a hutch to get at a rabbit--is the real risk of disease from insects. Because of hurricanes, we have had explosions of various insects all over Florida who are vectors for the transmission of many nasty diseases that have no treatment or cure in rabbits. I hope that if you can rearrange your household a little that you'll bring your bunnies indoors, both for their comfort and safety.

There have been some other posts on cold weather and rabbits in the last few days. They like being cool, but not cold. A wild rabbit can burrow underground to stay warm, but our domestic buns can't.

Cameron


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bread and carbs for rabbits

Cameron McLaughlin <cmm2000@...>
 

Bread and cereals of any kind may cause an overgrowth of bad bacteria such as clostridium in the gut. Please don't take the chance with a frail bunny of giving complex carbs even as a treat. Children like sweet, starchy foods that are bad for them, too, but that doesn't mean I'll give in and let them have them.

I've never met a rabbit who would decline a tiny piece of banana, but too much fruit sugar may be equally chancy. Same for carrots and sweet root vegetables. The closer you can stick to what a rabbit evolved to eat in nature--calorie-poor, high-fiber grasses and forages--the bigger your margin of safety.

Cameron and the bunny barn




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