Date   

Re: Wet corners of mouth

Nancy Ainsworth
 

Hi AJ,
I would bring your bun back in for an exam as soon as you are able. Drooling is a clear sign there's something not right with his mouth and it may be something new, or it maybe something related to the trim 4 weeks ago (like a spur is back, just enough to make him uncomfortable). 
Do let us know what the vet finds. Good luck.
Nancy


-----Original Message-----
From: aj_feldman <emfole@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 10:45 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Wet corners of mouth

Hey Everyone,

My four(ish) year old Flemish Giant had his teeth trimmed 4/2/2021 by Dr. Wilson at the Center for Avian and Exotic Medicine in Manhattan. Today I noticed the left side of his mouth is wet and the fur is clumped. I've seen this before and is one of the reasons I started bringing him to the vet for dentals. It seems like this tooth trim did not prevent what I assume is drooling? The area is clearly tender because he flinches when I try to examine it. 

Could folks please share experiences and diagnoses you have received for rabbits who have had wet and tender mouth area with clumped fur?

Thanks very much,
AJ emfole@...


Re: Gurgly stomach

 

I do not feed clover hay for that reason, but I'm sure you can find others who will have experience.
Just like humans, all rabbits are different, some rabbits can eat certain greens and be fine while others would get sick if they ate that same food.. Your rabbit will show you what they can and can't handle. You just have to pay attention. A rabbit's poops can tell you a lot about their GI health.
but if you don't already, I would definitely feed "plain" hay as well. Like 100% timothy hay, with nothing else in it, no herbs or anything like that. or Orchard Grass.. variety is always good.

I think of clover like a treat, so try to mix in some plain hay with it, or only feed the clover hay once a week or as a special snack. At first your bunny may reject the "plain" hay, especially if all they've been getting for the past 6 months is clover hay.
Clover Hay can be similar to getting them off Alfalfa Hay in that way... They will only want to eat the clover hay because they've been getting too spoiled with it. 

I just want to add that this is just my personal opinion and we all have them.

When it comes to my babies, I personally just like to avoid unnecessary risks whenever possible. I'm sure you are well aware of how sensitive they are and how important diet is to their overall health and life.

Anything that has the potential to cause gas is always a gamble.

I'm glad your bun has been fine thus far. I don't want to hijack the OP's post but if you would like to talk more you can always message me or post a new thread asking other's opinions and experience.
Not everyone will agree, so I suggest you do some research of your own so you can form your own opinion and decide for yourself what would be best for your specific rabbit :)

Jess


Re: Gurgly stomach

Laura
 

Thanks for the side note! My bun has been eating one ear up for over six months now, and hasn’t had a problem. Should I be concerned for the future? Is this something that over time will get worse?

Laura


On Apr 30, 2021, at 12:28 PM, ThumpersMama18 <jmiller111391@...> wrote:

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 10:05 PM, Laura wrote:
obably don’t need the metacam unless they seem to be in pain. Be sure good quality hay is what they’re eating. I order hay for my bun from one ear up hay in Vermont. They ship. My bun had a bad episode of not eating l
Just wanted to comment about One Ear Up Hay.. all the different varieties of hay they sell contain clover, which can cause gas in some rabbits.
Some people who do like to feed clover hays will only do so as a "treat hay" just to lessen the risk of upset stomach. I don't know if you feed other plain hay as a "main hay" or if you only feed clover hay, but I just wanted to let you know in case you were unaware!  :)


Re: Gurgly stomach

 

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 10:05 PM, Laura wrote:
obably don’t need the metacam unless they seem to be in pain. Be sure good quality hay is what they’re eating. I order hay for my bun from one ear up hay in Vermont. They ship. My bun had a bad episode of not eating l
Just wanted to comment about One Ear Up Hay.. all the different varieties of hay they sell contain clover, which can cause gas in some rabbits.
Some people who do like to feed clover hays will only do so as a "treat hay" just to lessen the risk of upset stomach. I don't know if you feed other plain hay as a "main hay" or if you only feed clover hay, but I just wanted to let you know in case you were unaware!  :)


Re: please help! in dire need

 

I just wanted to reply that Miffy should probably see a rabbit savvy vet.
My rabbit started doing this which was NOT like him at all, he would pee RIGHT next to his litter box, and you could tell it didn't feel good so I immediately knew something wasn't right... we found out that he had some irritation at the tip of his penis... inside AND outside the tip. He is almost 4 years old and he is neutered.

Think of it like a UTI, but there was no systemic infection. The bacteria from cecotrope residue was sitting there (he's a bigger bun and cant always reach completely to clean himself) so the bacteria was just sitting on the skin and caused UTI-like symptoms. 

We did a bunch of testing because at first we thought maybe sludge or stones, but thankfully it was just a weird thing that went away with some meds and wound balm to put on the area to help soothe it, and checking his bum frequently to make sure its clean. He didn't have poopy butt, it was literally just a tiny spot of dried ceco that caused this whole thing. 

Does Miffy act uncomfortable when she goes? Does she move around a lot when she's in her litter box? When does she pee outside her box?

With my rabbit it was immediately after he jumped out of his litter box and you could tell that it didn't feel good, like all the muscle-contracting from him jumping out of his box was expressing his bladder. 


Wet corners of mouth

aj_feldman
 

Hey Everyone,

My four(ish) year old Flemish Giant had his teeth trimmed 4/2/2021 by Dr. Wilson at the Center for Avian and Exotic Medicine in Manhattan. Today I noticed the left side of his mouth is wet and the fur is clumped. I've seen this before and is one of the reasons I started bringing him to the vet for dentals. It seems like this tooth trim did not prevent what I assume is drooling? The area is clearly tender because he flinches when I try to examine it. 

Could folks please share experiences and diagnoses you have received for rabbits who have had wet and tender mouth area with clumped fur?

Thanks very much,
AJ emfole@...


Re: please help! in dire need

mary
 

Veronica, it sounds like you are extremely fastidious. Unfortunately animals (and children) can be messy. I have had many rabbits and have dealt with old age, terminally ill, territorial types, and ones that are just not as conforming as others. I have an expensive rug from NY with a few stains to remind me. Please accept the fact that things change and if you really love your bun you will not get angry at an animal that cannot help it; we bring them into our home and should never expect them to be anything other than another creature with "faults". Keep up the love!


Re: please help! in dire need

lakesancutuary
 

Our girl, Roxie, after years of perfect little box habits suddenly decided that she would rather stand outside the little box and eat her hay.  She left a big pile of poop that was easy to scoop up and throw out (or save and use for fertilizer!).   After several minutes she'd hop in and finish her meal and toilet.   

If she seems healthy overall this may just be a phase and I'd live with it.  She is 12 and IMO deserves some understanding.

Martha and our sweet dog Fletcher




On Thursday, April 29, 2021, 03:25:23 PM EDT, Claudine Stone <claudinestone@...> wrote:


My boy lived to 12 and deteriorated quickly. It was hard. But they slow down a lot. I got him a very low end liter pan and that helped. But like humans, we hurt, get tired, have urinary incontinence and move more slowly as we age. Love to your bunny!


On Apr 29, 2021, at 3:20 PM, meljpears via groups.io <meljpears@...> wrote:

I've had the pleasure of the company of many of my house rabbits reaching double figures  over the years. At 12, your bunny is probably the equivalent of a person in their 80's (or more). Every single bunny who has reached this age has had some level of deterioration in their litter habits and some level of stiff or arthritic joints. Even when seemingly agile and fully fit, they rest more and maybe don't always feel like jumping in and out of boxes. 

I would place blankets or puppy pads in the areas Miffy has the odd accident, maybe add a couple of potting trays filled with hay (very low on one side so jumping isn't necessary) and accept that an elderly bunny, just as with an elderly cat or dog (or human) might have the odd lapse. You're very lucky to have your bunny companion reach this age so enjoy her company whilst she's with you. I'm sure any visitors to your home will understand the situation and I find the odd bunny 'currant'  here and there is to be expected.

I hope Miffy stays happy, well and agile for as long as possible 🐇


On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 at 18:17, veronica torres
<veronicaclairetorres@...> wrote:


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 13:11 Nancy Ainsworth via groups.io <jtawired=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Veronica,
A 12 year old bunny is very old, like an elderly person. Although she may be energetic and jumping well, she may have some beginning arthritic changes in her body. Alternatively she may be thinking she is actually in a litter box when she pees or poops near one. Elderly people have "accidents", elderly bunnies have "accidents", too, for a variety of reasons. She is not doing it to piss you off. 

You might try: adding a low-sided litter box to what you have, laying down puppy pee pads in the areas she is having accidents to make for easier clean up, bringing her in for a vet appointment to check her out physically and be sure nothing is wrong. I'm sure others may have some helpful hints, too. Miffy is a lucky bunny to have made it to 12 years old!
Nancy 



-----Original Message-----
From: veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 11:12 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] please help! in dire need

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀

--
Veronica.T🎀

--
Martha and her angel bunnies Cappy, Biscuit & Roxie


quality of life

Fern Ellen Cohen
 

A low-sided litter pan is a great idea and one I have used but quality of life is so important and animals have the opportunity that we humans don't : the decision of the parent to say goodbye when the quaity of life deteriorates.  It's hard but when there is suffering and pain,we must be grateful for the time we had, and open our hearts to a new baby.  If there's one thing I have learned in this journey it's this:  there is no better honor to a dear departed pet than to open our hearts to another.  Please don't keep an animal alive in pain and otherwise suffering when quality of life plunges so low that we keep him/her alive just to suit ourselves.  Your vet can help you make this assessment.
Fern  


Re: please help! in dire need

Claudine Stone
 

My boy lived to 12 and deteriorated quickly. It was hard. But they slow down a lot. I got him a very low end liter pan and that helped. But like humans, we hurt, get tired, have urinary incontinence and move more slowly as we age. Love to your bunny!


On Apr 29, 2021, at 3:20 PM, meljpears via groups.io <meljpears@...> wrote:

I've had the pleasure of the company of many of my house rabbits reaching double figures  over the years. At 12, your bunny is probably the equivalent of a person in their 80's (or more). Every single bunny who has reached this age has had some level of deterioration in their litter habits and some level of stiff or arthritic joints. Even when seemingly agile and fully fit, they rest more and maybe don't always feel like jumping in and out of boxes. 

I would place blankets or puppy pads in the areas Miffy has the odd accident, maybe add a couple of potting trays filled with hay (very low on one side so jumping isn't necessary) and accept that an elderly bunny, just as with an elderly cat or dog (or human) might have the odd lapse. You're very lucky to have your bunny companion reach this age so enjoy her company whilst she's with you. I'm sure any visitors to your home will understand the situation and I find the odd bunny 'currant'  here and there is to be expected.

I hope Miffy stays happy, well and agile for as long as possible 🐇


On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 at 18:17, veronica torres
<veronicaclairetorres@...> wrote:


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 13:11 Nancy Ainsworth via groups.io <jtawired=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Veronica,
A 12 year old bunny is very old, like an elderly person. Although she may be energetic and jumping well, she may have some beginning arthritic changes in her body. Alternatively she may be thinking she is actually in a litter box when she pees or poops near one. Elderly people have "accidents", elderly bunnies have "accidents", too, for a variety of reasons. She is not doing it to piss you off. 

You might try: adding a low-sided litter box to what you have, laying down puppy pee pads in the areas she is having accidents to make for easier clean up, bringing her in for a vet appointment to check her out physically and be sure nothing is wrong. I'm sure others may have some helpful hints, too. Miffy is a lucky bunny to have made it to 12 years old!
Nancy 



-----Original Message-----
From: veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 11:12 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] please help! in dire need

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀

--
Veronica.T🎀


Re: please help! in dire need

meljpears
 

I've had the pleasure of the company of many of my house rabbits reaching double figures  over the years. At 12, your bunny is probably the equivalent of a person in their 80's (or more). Every single bunny who has reached this age has had some level of deterioration in their litter habits and some level of stiff or arthritic joints. Even when seemingly agile and fully fit, they rest more and maybe don't always feel like jumping in and out of boxes. 

I would place blankets or puppy pads in the areas Miffy has the odd accident, maybe add a couple of potting trays filled with hay (very low on one side so jumping isn't necessary) and accept that an elderly bunny, just as with an elderly cat or dog (or human) might have the odd lapse. You're very lucky to have your bunny companion reach this age so enjoy her company whilst she's with you. I'm sure any visitors to your home will understand the situation and I find the odd bunny 'currant'  here and there is to be expected.

I hope Miffy stays happy, well and agile for as long as possible 🐇


On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 at 18:17, veronica torres
<veronicaclairetorres@...> wrote:


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 13:11 Nancy Ainsworth via groups.io <jtawired=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Veronica,
A 12 year old bunny is very old, like an elderly person. Although she may be energetic and jumping well, she may have some beginning arthritic changes in her body. Alternatively she may be thinking she is actually in a litter box when she pees or poops near one. Elderly people have "accidents", elderly bunnies have "accidents", too, for a variety of reasons. She is not doing it to piss you off. 

You might try: adding a low-sided litter box to what you have, laying down puppy pee pads in the areas she is having accidents to make for easier clean up, bringing her in for a vet appointment to check her out physically and be sure nothing is wrong. I'm sure others may have some helpful hints, too. Miffy is a lucky bunny to have made it to 12 years old!
Nancy 



-----Original Message-----
From: veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 11:12 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] please help! in dire need

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀

--
Veronica.T🎀


Re: please help! in dire need

veronica torres
 



On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 13:11 Nancy Ainsworth via groups.io <jtawired=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Veronica,
A 12 year old bunny is very old, like an elderly person. Although she may be energetic and jumping well, she may have some beginning arthritic changes in her body. Alternatively she may be thinking she is actually in a litter box when she pees or poops near one. Elderly people have "accidents", elderly bunnies have "accidents", too, for a variety of reasons. She is not doing it to piss you off. 

You might try: adding a low-sided litter box to what you have, laying down puppy pee pads in the areas she is having accidents to make for easier clean up, bringing her in for a vet appointment to check her out physically and be sure nothing is wrong. I'm sure others may have some helpful hints, too. Miffy is a lucky bunny to have made it to 12 years old!
Nancy 



-----Original Message-----
From: veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 11:12 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] please help! in dire need

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀

--
Veronica.T🎀


Re: please help! in dire need

Nancy Ainsworth
 

Hi Veronica,
A 12 year old bunny is very old, like an elderly person. Although she may be energetic and jumping well, she may have some beginning arthritic changes in her body. Alternatively she may be thinking she is actually in a litter box when she pees or poops near one. Elderly people have "accidents", elderly bunnies have "accidents", too, for a variety of reasons. She is not doing it to piss you off. 

You might try: adding a low-sided litter box to what you have, laying down puppy pee pads in the areas she is having accidents to make for easier clean up, bringing her in for a vet appointment to check her out physically and be sure nothing is wrong. I'm sure others may have some helpful hints, too. Miffy is a lucky bunny to have made it to 12 years old!
Nancy 


-----Original Message-----
From: veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 11:12 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] please help! in dire need

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀


Re: please help! in dire need

BenBun'sMom
 

Maybe a qualified vet evaluation is in order, especially given her laudable age, the unknown status of her repro system, and that this behavior can also indicate problems in the urinary tract.  Even though she jumps, could you cut one side of the box low, wide enough for her comfortably to walk through?  A 2-3 inch high remaining wall should contain much of the mess.  In lieu of confinement to a hutch, could you consider a 4x4 fence enclosure?  Are there any stressors that affect her ... household changes of any kind?  Good luck solving the mystery. 


On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 11:12 AM veronica torres <veronicaclairetorres@...> wrote:
my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀


please help! in dire need

veronica torres
 

my twelve year old rabbit miffy is a free roamer and is litter trained - well, sort of. she has a large cat sized litter box that she runs and jumps into each time she has to relieve herself - most of the time. she relieves herself in her litter box 99% of the time. but that one percent man - she poos a few drops on her blanket on the floor and next to ( but not in ) her litter box and sometimes even pees small amounts on the floor. people wonder if her old age prevents her from running and jumping into the litter box like normal, but i know for certain that this is not true. she is energetic and runs and jumps all over the place. and for the most part she will go out of her way to relieve herself in the litter box. so the box itself is not the problem. sure its a bit high up but she is almost always willing to jump, plus she is a digger so the high sides are helpful ( even though sometimes a bit of litter and droppings fall out of it - but she gets a pass on that. ) but what she doesn’t get a pass on, is pooping on the floor straight up, pooping near her bed, and god forbid - peeing. there is no excuse to me. she has a huge litter box that is filled with hay and litter and is cleaned on a regular basis, she jumps in and pees and poops in it the majority of the time, and the carpet and the blankets are washed and cleaned like more often than once a week. the environment is so sanitary - so it’s not like the smell of the carpet initiates her to go. right now she has her main litter box, and a smaller training litter box ( a high sided plastic tub with litter and hay ) and this morning i found that she peed right next to the training box, but not in it. this is so peculiar because usually the multiple litter boxes solve the issue right away. she pooped like two or three droppings in the training box, and she did most of her business in the main one. but regardless, she peed outside of both litter boxes. and i was pissed. i don’t know if she is spayed though, and i dont know what the reason or the solution could be because if she doesnt get the hang of the litter box rule completely, she will have to be in a hutch at night. which i don’t believe in. i need help as soon as possible. immediate advice is needed right now. i love how she does most of her business in her litter box - but i need the outside peeing and pooping to END. --
Veronica.T🎀


Re: Gurgly stomach

Erik and Maizey aka crazy Maizey
 

In my experience, and word from my bun savvy vet, loud gurgles are a precursor to GI stasis. It is the intestines trying their hardest to pass the blockage that is forming. Simethicone is important right now. If you have Cisapride or meloxicam for GI stimulation administer those. If gurgling stops and eating stops too, then do not give those 2 meds but simethicone is always fine yet sometimes ineffective. Wet greens, tummy rubs, Timothy hay is important. No sugar. No fruit. No sugar. Creates more gas. Bloat is lethal. 


Re: Gurgly stomach

tiffanie fisher
 

Thanks
She literally has been eating romaine and alfalfa daily her entire life. That said, I’ll try stopping the alfalfa. Even though it’s her favorite... ☹️

On Apr 27, 2021, at 23:35, Laura Wile <magnolia14@aol.com> wrote:

I’ve been told that older buns shouldn’t be given alfalfa either. The romaine lettuce along with the alfalfa might be too much for her tummy to tolerate st this age.

Laura


On Apr 27, 2021, at 11:11 PM, tiffanie fisher <tiffaniefisher@hotmail.com> wrote:

Thanks everyone. I gave her the simethicone. And I gave her a belly rub. Interesting, the gurgling is specifically in her intestine. I can feel it. I’m not sure if she is passing gas. But when I do massage her it feels like I’m pushing the bubbles around. She didn’t enjoy the massage. She tolerated it. And then gave me “F-U” kicks as she walked away to eat a few bites of alfalfa. She is now munching on some romaine lettuce which she eats daily.

I’ll check in with her later tonight and then call the vet in the morning .

Thanks for all your input. All is welcome.

Tiffanie, Lil, and Jack





On Apr 27, 2021, at 22:00, David L. Fisher <dlf@cotse.net> wrote:

The very first thing you can do right now for the fastest and safest effect - Get some type of anti-gas drops/chewable tablets that have SIMETHICONE as the active ingredient, and mix with something your rabbit will eat (Monty loves when I mix in a cherry-flavored Gax-X tablet pulverized and with about 1/2" banana). If you don't have these, you can probably get both of those in one run to a CVS or Walgreens. :)

Also do some gentle tummy massage towards the rear, to help gas bubbles move through and finally out. To quote an article I think is from HRS or even Dana Krempels in particular, "a farting bunny is a happy bunny" - and it may take a few rounds. Lil will tell you if it's helping, y'know?

I had a rabbit once (one of the twins) where I could hear her from across the room - I did the above two steps, helped her discover how to pass gas, and she was all better.

Of course, always call your vet - but this you can do immediately.

Dave


On 4/27/2021 9:36 PM, tiffanie fisher wrote:
My almost 10 yr old Lil’s stomach has been gurgling loudly like I’ve never heard before. I looked it up and it says it is probably gas and that it isn’t good. I first heard it last night. She seemed ok but I gave her semethicone and some water and metacam. She ate and drank and seemed fine today. Once again, as she is laying with her husbun,
It’s gurgling again. Again, she seems ok. I just gave her half a raisin and she ripped it out of my hand. Now she is staring at me expectantly for a follow up raisin.

Any ideas? I will call the vet tomorrow. Recently I’ve given both my rabbits a little baby food with their pellets. Basically just doing what I can to encourage them to eat more calories. So I thought maybe the baby food (raspberry/oatmeal) may have sugars or something that is new to their digestive systems. I’ve stopped since I heard her stomach gurgle. Otherwise nothing new. She is almost 10, pasturella positive and deaf. My Jack is almost 15, arthritic, and blind. And they are the loves of my life.

Thanks I’m advance for any ideas.

Tiffanie









Re: Gurgly stomach

Laura
 

I’ve been told that older buns shouldn’t be given alfalfa either. The romaine lettuce along with the alfalfa might be too much for her tummy to tolerate st this age.

Laura

On Apr 27, 2021, at 11:11 PM, tiffanie fisher <tiffaniefisher@hotmail.com> wrote:

Thanks everyone. I gave her the simethicone. And I gave her a belly rub. Interesting, the gurgling is specifically in her intestine. I can feel it. I’m not sure if she is passing gas. But when I do massage her it feels like I’m pushing the bubbles around. She didn’t enjoy the massage. She tolerated it. And then gave me “F-U” kicks as she walked away to eat a few bites of alfalfa. She is now munching on some romaine lettuce which she eats daily.

I’ll check in with her later tonight and then call the vet in the morning .

Thanks for all your input. All is welcome.

Tiffanie, Lil, and Jack





On Apr 27, 2021, at 22:00, David L. Fisher <dlf@cotse.net> wrote:

The very first thing you can do right now for the fastest and safest effect - Get some type of anti-gas drops/chewable tablets that have SIMETHICONE as the active ingredient, and mix with something your rabbit will eat (Monty loves when I mix in a cherry-flavored Gax-X tablet pulverized and with about 1/2" banana). If you don't have these, you can probably get both of those in one run to a CVS or Walgreens. :)

Also do some gentle tummy massage towards the rear, to help gas bubbles move through and finally out. To quote an article I think is from HRS or even Dana Krempels in particular, "a farting bunny is a happy bunny" - and it may take a few rounds. Lil will tell you if it's helping, y'know?

I had a rabbit once (one of the twins) where I could hear her from across the room - I did the above two steps, helped her discover how to pass gas, and she was all better.

Of course, always call your vet - but this you can do immediately.

Dave


On 4/27/2021 9:36 PM, tiffanie fisher wrote:
My almost 10 yr old Lil’s stomach has been gurgling loudly like I’ve never heard before. I looked it up and it says it is probably gas and that it isn’t good. I first heard it last night. She seemed ok but I gave her semethicone and some water and metacam. She ate and drank and seemed fine today. Once again, as she is laying with her husbun,
It’s gurgling again. Again, she seems ok. I just gave her half a raisin and she ripped it out of my hand. Now she is staring at me expectantly for a follow up raisin.

Any ideas? I will call the vet tomorrow. Recently I’ve given both my rabbits a little baby food with their pellets. Basically just doing what I can to encourage them to eat more calories. So I thought maybe the baby food (raspberry/oatmeal) may have sugars or something that is new to their digestive systems. I’ve stopped since I heard her stomach gurgle. Otherwise nothing new. She is almost 10, pasturella positive and deaf. My Jack is almost 15, arthritic, and blind. And they are the loves of my life.

Thanks I’m advance for any ideas.

Tiffanie









Re: Gurgly stomach

tiffanie fisher
 

Thanks everyone. I gave her the simethicone. And I gave her a belly rub. Interesting, the gurgling is specifically in her intestine. I can feel it. I’m not sure if she is passing gas. But when I do massage her it feels like I’m pushing the bubbles around. She didn’t enjoy the massage. She tolerated it. And then gave me “F-U” kicks as she walked away to eat a few bites of alfalfa. She is now munching on some romaine lettuce which she eats daily.

I’ll check in with her later tonight and then call the vet in the morning .

Thanks for all your input. All is welcome.

Tiffanie, Lil, and Jack

On Apr 27, 2021, at 22:00, David L. Fisher <dlf@cotse.net> wrote:

The very first thing you can do right now for the fastest and safest effect - Get some type of anti-gas drops/chewable tablets that have SIMETHICONE as the active ingredient, and mix with something your rabbit will eat (Monty loves when I mix in a cherry-flavored Gax-X tablet pulverized and with about 1/2" banana). If you don't have these, you can probably get both of those in one run to a CVS or Walgreens. :)

Also do some gentle tummy massage towards the rear, to help gas bubbles move through and finally out. To quote an article I think is from HRS or even Dana Krempels in particular, "a farting bunny is a happy bunny" - and it may take a few rounds. Lil will tell you if it's helping, y'know?

I had a rabbit once (one of the twins) where I could hear her from across the room - I did the above two steps, helped her discover how to pass gas, and she was all better.

Of course, always call your vet - but this you can do immediately.

Dave


On 4/27/2021 9:36 PM, tiffanie fisher wrote:
My almost 10 yr old Lil’s stomach has been gurgling loudly like I’ve never heard before. I looked it up and it says it is probably gas and that it isn’t good. I first heard it last night. She seemed ok but I gave her semethicone and some water and metacam. She ate and drank and seemed fine today. Once again, as she is laying with her husbun,
It’s gurgling again. Again, she seems ok. I just gave her half a raisin and she ripped it out of my hand. Now she is staring at me expectantly for a follow up raisin.

Any ideas? I will call the vet tomorrow. Recently I’ve given both my rabbits a little baby food with their pellets. Basically just doing what I can to encourage them to eat more calories. So I thought maybe the baby food (raspberry/oatmeal) may have sugars or something that is new to their digestive systems. I’ve stopped since I heard her stomach gurgle. Otherwise nothing new. She is almost 10, pasturella positive and deaf. My Jack is almost 15, arthritic, and blind. And they are the loves of my life.

Thanks I’m advance for any ideas.

Tiffanie






Re: Gurgly stomach

Laura
 

When my bun had a gurgling stomach, I was told to not give any more greens and very little treats/fruit if at all. As they age, some buns can’t handle greens.
The simethicone is good. Probably don’t need the metacam unless they seem to be in pain. Be sure good quality hay is what they’re eating. I order hay for my bun from one ear up hay in Vermont. They ship. My bun had a bad episode of not eating last year, and this hay was what saved him.

Good luck.

Laura

On Apr 27, 2021, at 9:36 PM, tiffanie fisher <tiffaniefisher@hotmail.com> wrote:

My almost 10 yr old Lil’s stomach has been gurgling loudly like I’ve never heard before. I looked it up and it says it is probably gas and that it isn’t good. I first heard it last night. She seemed ok but I gave her semethicone and some water and metacam. She ate and drank and seemed fine today. Once again, as she is laying with her husbun,
It’s gurgling again. Again, she seems ok. I just gave her half a raisin and she ripped it out of my hand. Now she is staring at me expectantly for a follow up raisin.

Any ideas? I will call the vet tomorrow. Recently I’ve given both my rabbits a little baby food with their pellets. Basically just doing what I can to encourage them to eat more calories. So I thought maybe the baby food (raspberry/oatmeal) may have sugars or something that is new to their digestive systems. I’ve stopped since I heard her stomach gurgle. Otherwise nothing new. She is almost 10, pasturella positive and deaf. My Jack is almost 15, arthritic, and blind. And they are the loves of my life.

Thanks I’m advance for any ideas.

Tiffanie



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