cellulose insulation as litter?


David L. Fisher
 

Hi Mara - GET RID OF IT!!

I got as far as reading that a mask is required when working with this stuff - that's all I needed to read to say "don't use it for your bunnies".  I see that others have also replied, with more in-depth information.  It may be cheaper, but it wasn't created for use as litter and certain things (such as residue/byproducts) were not held to the same standard.

The dust hazard screams volumes about what it should not be used for - and I doubt you want this dust floating around your home either.  :)

Dave


On 7/4/2018 12:04 PM, Mara and Sam kabukibun@... [etherbun] wrote:
 
Hi,

I have a question about a product I have never before seen used in a rabbit litter box.  

One of our adopters had to have her 12.5 year old rabbit PTS this week and wants to wait a few months before adopting another.  She offered to donate the supplies she had on hand and yesterday brought me some fresh veggies, a newly opened bag of Oxbow timothy pellets, and a variety of grass hays from Oxbow and Kaytee (she'd be trying to coax her rabbit to eat more hay). She also brought an open bag of GreenFiber R13-R60 Cellulose Blown-in Insulation.  She said it's made of recycled paper and that she buys it at Home Depot for much less that Carefresh or similar paper bedding.  She's been using it for quite a while.

I was a a bit wary about something used for home insulation, thinking it may be treated with chemicals, so I looked up the product specifications. The description says "Fire-resistant treated insulation is made with up to 85% recycled material that meets Class 1 Fire Rating to protect your home; giving you more time to evacuate."  And the installation instructions say to use "Safety eyewear and N95 NIOSH-approved particulate masks such as a 3M model #8210 or #8511 or equivalent for protection against nuisance dust."

I an inclined to toss the bag in the trash, but I wanted to know if anyone else had ever heard of using this product as litter or can tell me if my concerns about potential ill effects are well-founded (beyond the old adage "better safe than sorry'). And when she adopts another rabbit, I want to know whether there's a good scientific/medical reason to tell her not to use this product again.  BTW, her rabbit did not die of respiratory-related disease or a blockage.  Although I'm not sure what her mate died of 3-4 years ago. 

Thanks,
Mara







Mara Hurwitt & Sam Cox
 

Hi,

I have a question about a product I have never before seen used in a rabbit litter box.  

One of our adopters had to have her 12.5 year old rabbit PTS this week and wants to wait a few months before adopting another.  She offered to donate the supplies she had on hand and yesterday brought me some fresh veggies, a newly opened bag of Oxbow timothy pellets, and a variety of grass hays from Oxbow and Kaytee (she'd be trying to coax her rabbit to eat more hay). She also brought an open bag of GreenFiber R13-R60 Cellulose Blown-in Insulation.  She said it's made of recycled paper and that she buys it at Home Depot for much less that Carefresh or similar paper bedding.  She's been using it for quite a while.

I was a a bit wary about something used for home insulation, thinking it may be treated with chemicals, so I looked up the product specifications. The description says "Fire-resistant treated insulation is made with up to 85% recycled material that meets Class 1 Fire Rating to protect your home; giving you more time to evacuate."  And the installation instructions say to use "Safety eyewear and N95 NIOSH-approved particulate masks such as a 3M model #8210 or #8511 or equivalent for protection against nuisance dust."

I an inclined to toss the bag in the trash, but I wanted to know if anyone else had ever heard of using this product as litter or can tell me if my concerns about potential ill effects are well-founded (beyond the old adage "better safe than sorry'). And when she adopts another rabbit, I want to know whether there's a good scientific/medical reason to tell her not to use this product again.  BTW, her rabbit did not die of respiratory-related disease or a blockage.  Although I'm not sure what her mate died of 3-4 years ago. 

Thanks,
Mara






R
 

Trash. Normally you can look at the MSDS to see what's in the product. It has chemicals in it to prevent mold and rodents it looks like. Newsprint, Boric Acid, Zinc Sulfate, Ammonium Sulfate, and Distillate Mineral Oil. 


On 07/04/2018 09:04 AM, Mara and Sam kabukibun@... [etherbun] wrote:
 
Hi,

I have a question about a product I have never before seen used in a rabbit litter box.  

One of our adopters had to have her 12.5 year old rabbit PTS this week and wants to wait a few months before adopting another.  She offered to donate the supplies she had on hand and yesterday brought me some fresh veggies, a newly opened bag of Oxbow timothy pellets, and a variety of grass hays from Oxbow and Kaytee (she'd be trying to coax her rabbit to eat more hay). She also brought an open bag of GreenFiber R13-R60 Cellulose Blown-in Insulation.  She said it's made of recycled paper and that she buys it at Home Depot for much less that Carefresh or similar paper bedding.  She's been using it for quite a while.



bpbhoo
 

hi mara, i would not use that insulation. it sounds like it has fire-retardant chemicals which are dangerous. sha


Mara Hurwitt & Sam Cox
 

Thanks.  I specifically googled the MSDS sheet, which didn't come up in my initial search and wasn't readily accessible on the manufacturers' website.  I found the list of chemicals you mentioned.  And I also looked at the potential health effects listed on the safety sheet:

Inhalation:  Slightly irritating to upper respiratory system. Persons with respiratory problems should avoid breathing dust.
Eyes:  Slight irritant. In case of eye contact, flush with water.
Ingestion:  Small amounts are not likely to cause harm. Ingestion of large amounts may cause rash, diarrhea, nausea.
Skin:  Does not normally irritate skin. In case of broken skin, wear gloves and wash dust from skin with soap and plenty of water. Large amounts absorbed into bloodstream may cause rash, skin peeling, diarrhea, nausea, dizziness.
Acute:  None
Chronic:  None
Cancer:  Neither the end product nor any of its components.

Her rabbit had developed an eye ulcer that did not respond to treatment by an excellent rabbit vet, despite trying a series of different drops and ointments over a few months.  I wonder if had anything to do with the "litter" she was using.


-----Original Message-----
From: R vgrvgrvgrvgrvgr@... [etherbun]
To: etherbun
Sent: Wed, Jul 4, 2018 1:44 pm
Subject: Re: [EtherBun] cellulose insulation as litter?

 
 

GreenFiber R13-R60 Cellulose Blown-in Insulation.  

Trash. Normally you can look at the MSDS to see what's in the product. It has chemicals in it to prevent mold and rodents it looks like. Newsprint, Boric Acid, Zinc Sulfate, Ammonium Sulfate, and Distillate Mineral Oil. 


On 07/04/2018 09:04 AM, Mara and Sam kabukibun@... [etherbun] wrote:


Chris Norlund
 

Hi Mara!!

Ditto what Dave said----get rid of it.

 

The dust particles are probably irritating to the lungs and eyes, but maybe no long-range issues?  (heck----we are all familiar with ‘nuisance dust’, and should all be wearing protective eye/breathing gear when we handle hay anyway!)

However what worries me is the fire retardant that gives you time to get out of the house before it starts burning. THAT will have off-gassing fumes even without being exposed to heat. That stuff is toxic to the liver. I believe it is also on the list of chemicals that firefighters have associated with lymphoma (and other work-related acquired cancers). (don’t quote me on that----I’m just thinking about conversations with firefighter friend years ago).

 

Whatever possessed her to use that stuff?  I wonder if someone told her to?  Really would be interesting to have had necropsy info on both of her rabbits, to learn if there were any related issues.  I guess we need to keep this one on the radar and unwary people away from it.

 

Waving ‘hi’ from the other side of the country!

Chris

 

 

 

From: etherbun@... On Behalf Of 'David L. Fisher' dlf@... [etherbun]
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2018 11:08 PM
To: Mara and Sam ; etherbun@...
Subject: Re: [EtherBun] cellulose insulation as litter?

 

 

Hi Mara - GET RID OF IT!!

I got as far as reading that a mask is required when working with this stuff - that's all I needed to read to say "don't use it for your bunnies".  I see that others have also replied, with more in-depth information.  It may be cheaper, but it wasn't created for use as litter and certain things (such as residue/byproducts) were not held to the same standard.

The dust hazard screams volumes about what it should not be used for - and I doubt you want this dust floating around your home either.  :)

Dave

 

On 7/4/2018 12:04 PM, Mara and Sam kabukibun@... [etherbun] wrote:

 

Hi,



I have a question about a product I have never before seen used in a rabbit litter box.  



One of our adopters had to have her 12.5 year old rabbit PTS this week and wants to wait a few months before adopting another.  She offered to donate the supplies she had on hand and yesterday brought me some fresh veggies, a newly opened bag of Oxbow timothy pellets, and a variety of grass hays from Oxbow and Kaytee (she'd be trying to coax her rabbit to eat more hay). She also brought an open bag of GreenFiber R13-R60 Cellulose Blown-in Insulation.  She said it's made of recycled paper and that she buys it at Home Depot for much less that Carefresh or similar paper bedding.  She's been using it for quite a while.



I was a a bit wary about something used for home insulation, thinking it may be treated with chemicals, so I looked up the product specifications. The description says "Fire-resistant treated insulation is made with up to 85% recycled material that meets Class 1 Fire Rating to protect your home; giving you more time to evacuate."  And the installation instructions say to use "Safety eyewear and N95 NIOSH-approved particulate masks such as a 3M model #8210 or #8511 or equivalent for protection against nuisance dust."



I an inclined to toss the bag in the trash, but I wanted to know if anyone else had ever heard of using this product as litter or can tell me if my concerns about potential ill effects are well-founded (beyond the old adage "better safe than sorry'). And when she adopts another rabbit, I want to know whether there's a good scientific/medical reason to tell her not to use this product again.  BTW, her rabbit did not die of respiratory-related disease or a blockage.  Although I'm not sure what her mate died of 3-4 years ago. 



Thanks,

Mara











 


bpbhoo
 


Mara Hurwitt & Sam Cox
 

Thanks to everyone who replied (see, Etherbun is still alive and well and extremely useful!). Just so you know, the bag of insulation is still sitting in my garage and I had always intended to toss it into the trash.  But I was interested to know if anyone had previously come across people using this insulation as litter, as well as information on the chemical additives, particularly as my gut feeling was that it couldn't be pure recycled paper (as the donor thought) because that would be combustible in extreme heat and also subject to mildew in damp places.

I plan to have a private word with the vets to see if they think the litter might have contributed to the eye ulcer.  I will also let the donor know that she should definitely not use this with her next rabbit.  She doesn't have any rabbits right now, and I'd prefer to talk to her about it when she is ready to consider adopting again, rather than while she's grieving.

Etherbun still rocks!

Thanks,
Mara


-----Original Message-----
From: Christine Norlund
To: 'Mara and Sam'
Sent: Wed, Jul 4, 2018 5:44 pm
Subject: RE: [EtherBun] cellulose insulation as litter?

Hi Mara!!

Ditto what Dave said----get rid of it.

 


LT walking
 

My gosh - how informative- I love Etherbun. I read every digest email that I get even when it doesn’t currently figure about any issue I might have with my bun or if I don’t have any knowledge on the issue - I still learn something. Etherbun was so helpful when I had several buns from the same litter who all had health issues.
I don’t Facebook and don’t ever want to. So thank you all for continuing to participate in the email version. Thank you! LT