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Going no pellets / herb blends?


kristy
 

Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper


kristy
 

And, of course - this should have read “tummy upset”. :)

Kristy

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:11 AM, kristy via groups.io <needlegrrl=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper



Meg Brown
 

Hi Kristy,
I have given my bunnies a variety of dried herbs. For the sake of convenience, I often order from Bunny Bunch Boutique which has a wide selection of safe herbs and flowers.

Personally, I have never felt comfortable with a no-pellet diet. I feel that bunnies need a limited amount of a good quality, high-fiber pellet, (along with fresh greens and grass hay), for proper nutrition.
That is my opinion.

I hope that you’re bunny feels back to normal and that Hamilton, Mushroom, and Pepper enjoy their herbs.
Sincerely,
Meg and the bunnies of Buster’s Bunny Barn

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:35 AM, kristy <needlegrrl@...> wrote:

And, of course - this should have read “tummy upset”. :)

Kristy

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:11 AM, kristy via groups.io <needlegrrl=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper




Meg Brown
 

Oops sorry Kristy and Piper
“Piper”!

Great names🐰🐰🐰

On Sep 16, 2020, at 11:46 AM, Meg Brown <@MegCowboy> wrote:

Hi Kristy,
I have given my bunnies a variety of dried herbs. For the sake of convenience, I often order from Bunny Bunch Boutique which has a wide selection of safe herbs and flowers.

Personally, I have never felt comfortable with a no-pellet diet. I feel that bunnies need a limited amount of a good quality, high-fiber pellet, (along with fresh greens and grass hay), for proper nutrition.
That is my opinion.

I hope that you’re bunny feels back to normal and that Hamilton, Mushroom, and Pepper enjoy their herbs.
Sincerely,
Meg and the bunnies of Buster’s Bunny Barn

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:35 AM, kristy <needlegrrl@...> wrote:

And, of course - this should have read “tummy upset”. :)

Kristy

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:11 AM, kristy via groups.io <needlegrrl=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper




Meg Brown
 

Hi again Kristy,
I just realized that you also mentioned bladder sludge. After reading about water in Lucile Moore’s Rabbit Nutrition and Nutritional Healing book, I became concerned about giving my bunnies my “hard” well water.

I purchased a ZeroWater filter (pitcher/ filter plus extra filters) and found that my well water tests at over 900 PPM from the tap

This filter is great and brought the parts per million down to 39 the first time I used it.

I just checked for a friend and the tester (which comes with the filter/ pitcher), is sold separately in case you wanted to see if hard water May be contributing to any sludge issue.
For us, I’m suspecting it was.

I also treated the sludge with sub-Q fluids 2x a day, increased activity, a homeopathic remedy or two, (determined through muscle testing), and Trimethsulfa

I expressed the bunnies’ bladders during any periods of sludge, to help move the sludge out, also, (after gentle rocking)

This can be very helpful as well in my experience.
Meg

On Sep 16, 2020, at 11:49 AM, Meg Brown <@MegCowboy> wrote:

Oops sorry Kristy and Piper
“Piper”!

Great names🐰🐰🐰

On Sep 16, 2020, at 11:46 AM, Meg Brown <@MegCowboy> wrote:

Hi Kristy,
I have given my bunnies a variety of dried herbs. For the sake of convenience, I often order from Bunny Bunch Boutique which has a wide selection of safe herbs and flowers.

Personally, I have never felt comfortable with a no-pellet diet. I feel that bunnies need a limited amount of a good quality, high-fiber pellet, (along with fresh greens and grass hay), for proper nutrition.
That is my opinion.

I hope that you’re bunny feels back to normal and that Hamilton, Mushroom, and Pepper enjoy their herbs.
Sincerely,
Meg and the bunnies of Buster’s Bunny Barn

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:35 AM, kristy <needlegrrl@...> wrote:
And, of course - this should have read “tummy upset”. :)

Kristy

On Sep 16, 2020, at 10:11 AM, kristy via groups.io <needlegrrl=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper







 

Hey Kristy 

Ive recently started product testing different dehydrated herbs for my guys as well as fresh cut hay. 

From my experience of multiple bunnies- Dandelion leaves are no 1 but like kale and spinach they cant have too much, next are raspberry leaves and nettle leaves. I pick these from the farm or countryside where i know there are no pesticides or herbicides. I got a simply dehydrater and they love the crispy texture with their hay or standalone.
I also give them dried out apple wood and birch wood with the leaves on, you have to make sure they are dry all the way. 
Rose hips dried and de pitted. Very high in vitamin c. 
Like a lot of treats and herbs you have to give them in moderation but they love them. 

Also green out tops from oat hay are great for anxiety in buns. 
As well as a good meadow blend of hay, which has clover, dandelions, orchard grass and timothy in a mix. I think oxbow has a similar blend with chamomile mixed in.

You can go pellet free just may take a bit of work. I found some of the herbs and topper pretty expensive to get sent over to canada so i started researching local plants good food for buns, and now im cutting orchard and timothy by hand for my buns haha. Ive done a lot of reading from papers and bunny nutrition, im still learning. One of my buns doesnt like pellets so ive been trying to get him nutrition in other ways. 
Im hoping to seed a field next year. The fresh hay goes down way better than the oxbow stuff and is like a treat when i mix in the dried herbs, twigs, leaves and hips.

Sorry for the ramble. 

Hope it helps. 
Bali  


Meg Brown
 

On Sep 16, 2020, at 1:20 PM, Bali <gagandeep.s.bali@...> wrote:

Hey Kristy 

Ive recently started product testing different dehydrated herbs for my guys as well as fresh cut hay. 

From my experience of multiple bunnies- Dandelion leaves are no 1 but like kale and spinach they cant have too much, next are raspberry leaves and nettle leaves. I pick these from the farm or countryside where i know there are no pesticides or herbicides. I got a simply dehydrater and they love the crispy texture with their hay or standalone.
I also give them dried out apple wood and birch wood with the leaves on, you have to make sure they are dry all the way. 
Rose hips dried and de pitted. Very high in vitamin c. 
Like a lot of treats and herbs you have to give them in moderation but they love them. 

Also green out tops from oat hay are great for anxiety in buns. 
As well as a good meadow blend of hay, which has clover, dandelions, orchard grass and timothy in a mix. I think oxbow has a similar blend with chamomile mixed in.

You can go pellet free just may take a bit of work. I found some of the herbs and topper pretty expensive to get sent over to canada so i started researching local plants good food for buns, and now im cutting orchard and timothy by hand for my buns haha. Ive done a lot of reading from papers and bunny nutrition, im still learning. One of my buns doesnt like pellets so ive been trying to get him nutrition in other ways. 
Im hoping to seed a field next year. The fresh hay goes down way better than the oxbow stuff and is like a treat when i mix in the dried herbs, twigs, leaves and hips.

Sorry for the ramble. 

Hope it helps. 
Bali  


Emprins
 

Hey Kristy!

I also think that almost all bunnies need a small amount of pellets. It's very, very difficult to meet bunny's nutritional needs without pellets and it would require a lot of time and effort on your part to make sure that you have mixed together the right combo of veggies each day to do so. I wouldn't recommend it and think it's perfectly healthy to give them a small amount (around 1 tbsp per 2 lbs of bun), but if you are still interested, Bunny Approved has a good guide here: https://bunnyapproved.com/bunnys-pellet-free-diet/

I also highly recommend reading this page of the Reddit rabbit subreddit wiki for a more detailed, better cited discussion of pellet-free diets. 

I would definitely not recommend juicing a whole pineapple to feed your bun for both your own sanity and your bun's health. Pineapple juice, even fresh, contains a LOT of sugar, which is bad for bunnies, and the science for bromelain, the enzyme in pineapples, to dissolve hair in the digestive tract (not bladder sludge) is iffy and has largely been debunked. Small Pet Select had a decent article on pineapple juice you can find here: 
https://smallpetselect.com/pineapple-can-make-stasis-worse/

In terms of bladder sludge, they actually don't know what causes it. The new thinking is that it most likely is caused by lack of exercise because the calcium in the bladder needs to be shaken up so that it can be excreted properly and not form sludge. An older idea that is still common even among  many vets, including mine, is that the bunny carer should cut down on calcium in the diet and limit veggies high in calcium. Because so little is known about bladder sludge and out of caution I tend not to feed a ton of high calcium veggies together and feed a slightly lower in calcium pellet (Oxbow Garden Select). Here's a very thorough article on bladder sludge:


My advice would be to focus on getting your bunnies to be the best hay eaters they can be! Both dental issues and GI stasis are more likely to be avoided if your bunnies have good hay habbits. You can also add on some "hay topper", which is essentially what you were asking for recs for because it's often a blend of bunny-safe herbs and flowers, from somewhere like small pet select or a variety of trusted online small bunny businesses (check etsy!). 

Sending my best wishes to you and your buns! My girl, Eleanor, had stasis a few months ago and I was terrified and sick with worry. It can be such a financial and emotional stressor to have a sick bun so please make sure you're taking care of yourself too! 💗🐰

Emma


On Sep 16, 2020 at 10:11 AM, <kristy> wrote:

Hello, everyone!

We had some yummy upset (maybe stasis, we stopped eating yesterday) and as a result of our vet visit (xrays, teeth trimming for small points, bladder sludge), have been told to go zero pellets. (Eep!)

I can still give them as occasional treats, but they were getting 1/8 cup / day of the oxbow and a tablespoon of supreme selective.

The vet tech I spoke with in the parking lot recommended that I give them dried herb blends - she recommended the well-kept rabbit and small pet select. She also said that I could dehydrate my own herbs for them.

Does anyone give their bunnies dried herb blends? I know they need the fresh greens as well. (They are currently getting a mix of mint, basil, green leaf lettuce and romaine for those.)

Do you have any recommendations?

She also suggested juicing a pineapple weekly for them, and giving them 1-3 tablespoons each of fresh pineapple juice to help with the bladder sludge.

Thanks!
Kristy
Hamilton, Mushroom, & Piper




wendyandrayzer
 

My recently deceased 14-year-old bun ate no pellets, as advised by several vets.  I did give him a wide variety of low-oxalate greens every day, as I've heard from several sources that oxalates are more of an issue than calcium (i.e., NO spinach, Swiss chard, or beet greens!).  I also fed him a few fresh frozen cranberries daily.  He had no issues with going pellet-less.  I suggest that EVERYONE check out the Facebook page called Wild Nutrition & Foraging for Pet Rabbits to discover a whole new world of edibles for bunnies.  I've been drying wild foods all summer and now have an attic full of several huge boxes of dried wild foods.  Foraging is fun!


Chris Norlund
 

Hi Wendy,
Good idea for a discussion and idea sharing!
I dry new-growth apple branches, willow branches, rose petals/leaves, and berry leaves (BlackBerry, raspberry, and strawberry).
Some of these have medicinal value also. Willow has anti- inflammatory properties (source of main ingredient in aspirin). Black berry leaves have inulin-type fiber-- which is a great pre-biotic fiber that helps digestion and nutrient absorption, AND can help with loose or messy poop issues.

I just clip branches into shorter pieces, and berry leaves-- into clusters of 2-3, and drop them into a big cardboard box. Leave it open in a dark place (light affects the nutrients), and let them dry.  You have to fluff and aerate them every few days at first, too allow airflow between so they don't get mildewy.
When they are crunchy, they keep for months! 
Dandelion leaves need to be hung on a line or strung to help them dry out quicker.  They don't do well in a box or paper bag. 

Nasturtiums, mint and other herbs, and pansies, also are good options.

Chris



On Thu, Sep 17, 2020, 5:57 AM wendyandrayzer via groups.io <wendyandrayzer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My recently deceased 14-year-old bun ate no pellets, as advised by several vets.  I did give him a wide variety of low-oxalate greens every day, as I've heard from several sources that oxalates are more of an issue than calcium (i.e., NO spinach, Swiss chard, or beet greens!).  I also fed him a few fresh frozen cranberries daily.  He had no issues with going pellet-less.  I suggest that EVERYONE check out the Facebook page called Wild Nutrition & Foraging for Pet Rabbits to discover a whole new world of edibles for bunnies.  I've been drying wild foods all summer and now have an attic full of several huge boxes of dried wild foods.  Foraging is fun!


lakesancutuary
 

We always had fresh and dried willow twigs for our bunnies and they were seen as quite the treat.   Luckily we had willow trees that were not exposed to pesticides or auto fumes and we picked them with abandon.   Our bunnies would gobble them up like spaghetti.

And they were a sure fire test if any bun was "off."  Biscuit tended to have molar spurs and I think that chewing on the willow twig actually helped to keep them at bay.  Not sure my vet agreed, but it sure seemed that way to me.   I would make sure to have a HUGE supply all winter.

Martha and our sweet dog Fletcher




On Friday, September 18, 2020, 04:48:28 AM EDT, Chris Norlund <norlund.chris@...> wrote:


Hi Wendy,
Good idea for a discussion and idea sharing!
I dry new-growth apple branches, willow branches, rose petals/leaves, and berry leaves (BlackBerry, raspberry, and strawberry).
Some of these have medicinal value also. Willow has anti- inflammatory properties (source of main ingredient in aspirin). Black berry leaves have inulin-type fiber-- which is a great pre-biotic fiber that helps digestion and nutrient absorption, AND can help with loose or messy poop issues.

I just clip branches into shorter pieces, and berry leaves-- into clusters of 2-3, and drop them into a big cardboard box. Leave it open in a dark place (light affects the nutrients), and let them dry.  You have to fluff and aerate them every few days at first, too allow airflow between so they don't get mildewy.
When they are crunchy, they keep for months! 
Dandelion leaves need to be hung on a line or strung to help them dry out quicker.  They don't do well in a box or paper bag. 

Nasturtiums, mint and other herbs, and pansies, also are good options.

Chris



On Thu, Sep 17, 2020, 5:57 AM wendyandrayzer via groups.io <wendyandrayzer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My recently deceased 14-year-old bun ate no pellets, as advised by several vets.  I did give him a wide variety of low-oxalate greens every day, as I've heard from several sources that oxalates are more of an issue than calcium (i.e., NO spinach, Swiss chard, or beet greens!).  I also fed him a few fresh frozen cranberries daily.  He had no issues with going pellet-less.  I suggest that EVERYONE check out the Facebook page called Wild Nutrition & Foraging for Pet Rabbits to discover a whole new world of edibles for bunnies.  I've been drying wild foods all summer and now have an attic full of several huge boxes of dried wild foods.  Foraging is fun!


--
Martha and her angel bunnies Cappy, Biscuit & Roxie