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Good bunny article


mark
 

A well written article, by an academic economist, on what it's like to own a bunny.

It's nothing that the denizens of this group dont know.
But it reads easily and has good information for a potential bunny parent without getting bogged down in bunny jargon.

http://noahpinionblog.blogspot.com/2020/07/rabbit-good-friend-or-how-to-take-care.html

-mark

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Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.


Emprins
 

Great intro read! Thanks for sending! 

I just wish the picture relating to bunny cuddles didn’t have the person holding the bunny. Maybe some cuddle-buns like being held and cuddled but my guys really prefer to get their cuddles on their own terms, which usually means on the ground. It really took accepting that bunnies feel most comfortable on the ground for me to truly bond and get affectionate with my first bun and I think a lot of bunny companions would have a closer relationship to their buns if they handled them less. 

But that’s a great intro piece to send along to new bunny companions. Thanks, Mark!

Emma


On Aug 27, 2020 at 8:34 PM, <mark via groups.io> wrote:

A well written article, by an academic economist, on what it's like to own a bunny.

It's nothing that the denizens of this group dont know.
But it reads easily and has good information for a potential bunny parent  without getting bogged down in bunny jargon.

http://noahpinionblog.blogspot.com/2020/07/rabbit-good-friend-or-how-to-take-care.html

-mark

--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.




linedgroundsquirrels
 

Thanks for the article link.   Most of our rescues and sanctuary buns don't mind being held or picked up.   While volunteering at the shelter, I knew that wasn't the case with all rabbits.   One of the reasons I endure or bond with quiet rabbits is because we've had a majority of our adopteds, sanctuary or rescues willing to sit in our laps or tooth purr while being held.  Or polish me/us with velvet kisses. 


David L. Fisher
 

Monty is a great example of a rabbit that doesn't like to be held - he's big (10 pounds, 4.4 kg) REW Californian, and it's probably quite uncomfortable.  Occasionally I can set on the floor and get him to lie down against my legs for some scritches, and I usually know when he's receptive to a different kind of snuggling based on where he positions himself at the open part of his x-pen, where I have to lie down on the floor and sidle up to him much like another rabbit would do, and I act like I'm grooming him.  I hear a lot of tooth purring when I do that, and when he's had enough, he'll just hop away.

Drillbit (the newcomer, recently rescued and now neutered) will sit in my lap for a little while, and he'll usually tolerate snuggles where he lies against my legs, much like the way Monty will, but for a longer period of time.

Each bunny is different, and while I always liked the snuggliness of the first couple of rabbits I had, the greatest pleasure I get doesn't come from snuggling, it comes from seeing them happy and comfortable and safe.  My unsnuggly rabbits will still want to share space with me, and Monty is a perfect example of that - he insists on having a fence between his area and the rest of the living room, and he will hang out very close to me but on the other side of that fence.  I can pet him over or through the fence (the x-pen) and he doesn't mind at all, but after a short time my arm will start to go numb if I'm petting him over the fence.

Dave


On 9/24/2020 7:58 PM, linedgroundsquirrels via groups.io wrote:
Thanks for the article link.   Most of our rescues and sanctuary buns don't mind being held or picked up.   While volunteering at the shelter, I knew that wasn't the case with all rabbits.   One of the reasons I endure or bond with quiet rabbits is because we've had a majority of our adopteds, sanctuary or rescues willing to sit in our laps or tooth purr while being held.  Or polish me/us with velvet kisses.