just 4 weeks ago today


David L. Fisher
 

It was just 4 weeks ago today that I said goodbye to Monty, and true to history, today another bunny found me and is currently settling in.  I don't know if it's male or female, but I think pretty young and probably female - and hyper (at around 4 pounds, if that).  I set up a second x-pen next to Lily's with a buffer, and I already saw Lily lunge at the newcomer through the fences, so we'll have to let things calm down a bit.

The newcomer is very friendly, very social, and exploring as much as I'll allow without upsetting Lily any more than she is - clearly well cared-for before being abandoned, and no one was looking for him/her.  A nice family was able to walk right up and bring him/her (I think female, but don't know yet) inside and I saw a post about it and went over there today to bring the bunny home.  I'll be going to the vet for a checkup and schedule a spay (or neuter, if it turns out to be a male, but no "churchbells" hanging down, so...)

Q-Tip's legacy continues, Monty passed the torch to Lily, and now it's Lily's turn to help me welcome the newcomer.  So far, both bunnies are a bit overactive, so I'm trying to contain things - never saw Lily bouncing and circling, and the newcomer is noticing.  There is a precarious truce right now, only because they can't get at each other.

Dave


BenBun'sMom
 

It can be a bit rugged to leave intros to their own social skills, especially one well entrenched with her own ideas of the way the world should be, and a newbie who knows s/he's in/around another's turf.  Sometimes it may help to sit and hold the newbie on your lap, providing security and gradually allowing Lily to approach.  You can then pet and comfort Lily while continuing to be a safe buffer zone while they get closer, eye to eye, sniff noses but no real contact.  The process is painstaking, can take many hours over the course of days, but so long as you secure the one on your lap and remain vigilant to distract any attempt for either to sneak in a bite, it can help them become friends if they have a coach.  It's critical that you never drop your guard, allow one to escape or another to sneak in a nip or your process is back to ground zero or worse, like our inflation, negative.  Bunnies do have a way of finding us. All the best.


On Tue, Aug 24, 2021 at 10:34 PM David L. Fisher <dlf@...> wrote:
It was just 4 weeks ago today that I said goodbye to Monty, and true to
history, today another bunny found me and is currently settling in.  I
don't know if it's male or female, but I think pretty young and probably
female - and hyper (at around 4 pounds, if that).  I set up a second
x-pen next to Lily's with a buffer, and I already saw Lily lunge at the
newcomer through the fences, so we'll have to let things calm down a bit.

The newcomer is very friendly, very social, and exploring as much as
I'll allow without upsetting Lily any more than she is - clearly well
cared-for before being abandoned, and no one was looking for him/her.  A
nice family was able to walk right up and bring him/her (I think female,
but don't know yet) inside and I saw a post about it and went over there
today to bring the bunny home.  I'll be going to the vet for a checkup
and schedule a spay (or neuter, if it turns out to be a male, but no
"churchbells" hanging down, so...)

Q-Tip's legacy continues, Monty passed the torch to Lily, and now it's
Lily's turn to help me welcome the newcomer.  So far, both bunnies are a
bit overactive, so I'm trying to contain things - never saw Lily
bouncing and circling, and the newcomer is noticing.  There is a
precarious truce right now, only because they can't get at each other.

Dave







mary
 

Good for you to take a new bunny! Lily is appreciative even if she can't show it yet. Like I said before, my 2 inseparable bucks were vicious enemies for 9 months so be patient and keep their houses right next to each other. You can maybe squirt water in bad bunny's face when he/she shows bad aggression.
Mary, Baby and Boo


rlkessler
 

Wow, Dave..the tradition goes on.  Congratulations on your new bunny!  He/she is lucky to have you caring for her.  I hope all goes well during this get acquainted period.  Keep us
posted, and I hope you are feels bit better.

Take care,
Roberta


David L. Fisher
 

I think the newcomer is male (and it appears his testes are out but have not yet dropped, so they are not hanging and swinging around - I see "wrinkly pink apricots" as one webpage describes, but not the "dangling churchbells" which I described wth Drillbit).  He does show an unusual interest in stuff that used to belong to Monty (who would have left the scent of an intact female), whereas Lily will have no part of any of that scent - she wouldn't even venture into Monty's area after I had moved stuff out and gave her access. 

Yesterday I offered one of Monty's stuffies (actually a bonding puppet that definitely has her scent on it) and the newcomer already sprayed it  He also likes to wedge himself under it, especially the "front paw", like he's being snuggled by mama bunny.  He absolutely craves attention and contact, and whenever I'm out of reach, he runs up and down the hall and tries pushing at the fences to get closer to Lily.  I get the feeling he might be recently separated from the rest of a litter or mama/siblings, perhaps due to his hormonal behavior.  While snuggling with him last night, I couldn't help but notice how well-socialized he is, and he kept wedging himself under my arm as I was lying on my stomach and elbows (less of a "pet me" and more of a "snuggle me, I'll just stay under your armpit" kind of thing)

I have a vet appointment on Monday for a checkup and to schedule a neuter.



On 8/25/2021 5:46 AM, BenBun'sMom wrote:
It can be a bit rugged to leave intros to their own social skills, especially one well entrenched with her own ideas of the way the world should be, and a newbie who knows s/he's in/around another's turf.  Sometimes it may help to sit and hold the newbie on your lap, providing security and gradually allowing Lily to approach.  You can then pet and comfort Lily while continuing to be a safe buffer zone while they get closer, eye to eye, sniff noses but no real contact.  The process is painstaking, can take many hours over the course of days, but so long as you secure the one on your lap and remain vigilant to distract any attempt for either to sneak in a bite, it can help them become friends if they have a coach.  It's critical that you never drop your guard, allow one to escape or another to sneak in a nip or your process is back to ground zero or worse, like our inflation, negative.  Bunnies do have a way of finding us. All the best.

On Tue, Aug 24, 2021 at 10:34 PM David L. Fisher <dlf@...> wrote:
It was just 4 weeks ago today that I said goodbye to Monty, and true to
history, today another bunny found me and is currently settling in.  I
don't know if it's male or female, but I think pretty young and probably
female - and hyper (at around 4 pounds, if that).  I set up a second
x-pen next to Lily's with a buffer, and I already saw Lily lunge at the
newcomer through the fences, so we'll have to let things calm down a bit.

The newcomer is very friendly, very social, and exploring as much as
I'll allow without upsetting Lily any more than she is - clearly well
cared-for before being abandoned, and no one was looking for him/her.  A
nice family was able to walk right up and bring him/her (I think female,
but don't know yet) inside and I saw a post about it and went over there
today to bring the bunny home.  I'll be going to the vet for a checkup
and schedule a spay (or neuter, if it turns out to be a male, but no
"churchbells" hanging down, so...)

Q-Tip's legacy continues, Monty passed the torch to Lily, and now it's
Lily's turn to help me welcome the newcomer.  So far, both bunnies are a
bit overactive, so I'm trying to contain things - never saw Lily
bouncing and circling, and the newcomer is noticing.  There is a
precarious truce right now, only because they can't get at each other.

Dave







rlkessler
 

Dave,

The newcomer sounds like he will be a friend and sociable rabbit.  The neuter will help with the undesirable behavior.  Keep us posted, and good luck.

Roberta


David L. Fisher
 

He is incredibly friendly and sociable.  Lily wants no part of a young hyper intact male, so I have to wait before trying any introductions beyond "you can see the other bunny, but you can't have contact" - they are neighbors, but there's a towel blocking most of their view of each other and the fences are now properly secured.  And the newbie already showed he could jump the fence (2 feet high) and he perched between the fences (and then didn't know what to do) so I put him back in his pen and covered that area with more fencing over the top.

His first night here, he managed to get behind part of his x-pen (which is in a corner and doesn't go all the way around) - then he got caught between the fences and couldn't move.  I'm glad Lily didn't go on the attack, tho she did tear up her hidey box, perhaps trying to dig her way out, or maybe she was trying to get under where the newbie was to rescue him.  Who knows... right now I just want to keep the peace until he's calmer post-neuter, and I keep telling Lily that it wasn't that long ago that she was the newcomer and she had a less-than-welcoming hostess.

It pains me that someone would abandon such a wonderful critter, but I think most people who get bunnies have no idea what they're doing, or what they need to do, in order to have a great companion (and not a nutcase like he is right now).  Happily there are good people out there who care enough to help these buns - both Lily and the newcomer were picked up off the street by other families, then they found me.

Dave

On 8/27/2021 3:28 PM, rlkessler wrote:
Dave,

The newcomer sounds like he will be a friend and sociable rabbit. The neuter will help with the undesirable behavior.  Keep us posted, and good luck.

Roberta


mary
 

Dave, your comment on people getting rabbits they then dump reminds me of the local county fair; they have games where people can win a rabbit! Also, the fair has barns of animals like the rabbits in cramped cages in very hot weather often and I found out some were being sold for consumption...made me furious. Some of the rabbits were being raised by 4H kids and I only hope these kids loved and took good care of them. I will never attend another fair again.