Litter box for Flemish Giants


Meg Brown
 

Hi Leslie,
      You asked what can be used as a litter box.

I use both of these for my Caroline.
The grey one is a large cat box, so the sides are high.   I cut the front down very low as Caroline is a tripod bun (rear leg amputation)

I bought 3-4 of the lighter boxes (the one on the right)   They were sold years ago as dog litter boxes.
       I’m not sure if they are still available.     This works great for my Caroline and for bonded couples who enjoy dining (etc) together.

     For a large bun who can get more “spring” and jump a bit higher, you could possibly use a cement mixing tub, which is approximately 20” x 24” and 6.5” high

They are found in big box hardware stores like Lowe’s and Home Depot.   The last time I bought one it was $5.
      Enjoy your girl (and boys!)
🐰🐰🐰🐰
       Meg




Leslie B
 

Thanks, Meg. I never thought about a concrete mixing tub, but I did think about the pans restaurant clean up workers use. A concrete tub is much cheaper! I’m open to any other advice or suggestions on the care of Flemish giants which is different from smaller rabbits. I’ve had rabbits off and on for 16 years. This new Flemish is a biter. I’ve never encountered that either.😕


Kinenchen
 

I also use cement mixing tubs -  they're durable and inexpensive.

Christie Taylor


David L. Fisher
 

I used to use them as well, and they worked quite well for the twins who often were in them together.  It's been a while since I had a bonded pair, so I forgot about that.  :)

Dave


On 5/17/2021 2:15 PM, Kinenchen wrote:
I also use cement mixing tubs -  they're durable and inexpensive.

Christie Taylor


John Gee
 

Hi,

I've seen people use these with their FG's. They help with young ones getting use to a litter box. These and busboy trays used at restaurants are durable. They  work well with larger breeds.


Denise Fischer
 

For my Flemish Giants I've used the large size plastic storage bins (34" x 15" x 12" high). I cut a U-shaped entry at one end so that they don't have to jump over 12 inches, and I can make that entry lower as they age. No litter is kicked out, they can turn around nicely and it's perfect for relaxing in as well. I've used the smaller storage bins for my smaller rabbits. Wood pellets or pelleted horse bedding is the perfect litter, as they absorb odors well, break down into sawdust and last a long time. This litter is also compostable and is about $6 for a 40 pound bag in my area.


On Sat, May 15, 2021 at 11:17 AM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
Hi Leslie,
      You asked what can be used as a litter box.

I use both of these for my Caroline.
The grey one is a large cat box, so the sides are high.   I cut the front down very low as Caroline is a tripod bun (rear leg amputation)

I bought 3-4 of the lighter boxes (the one on the right)   They were sold years ago as dog litter boxes.
       I’m not sure if they are still available.     This works great for my Caroline and for bonded couples who enjoy dining (etc) together.

     For a large bun who can get more “spring” and jump a bit higher, you could possibly use a cement mixing tub, which is approximately 20” x 24” and 6.5” high

They are found in big box hardware stores like Lowe’s and Home Depot.   The last time I bought one it was $5.
      Enjoy your girl (and boys!)
🐰🐰🐰🐰
       Meg




Leslie B
 

Thanks so much for the suggestions. I’ve always used kitty litter with a grate to keep them from eating it or sitting in wetness. I like knowing when I clean the litter box it’s really clean. How long do pellets last or control the smell? If you compost it, does it not have hay seeds in it that might possibly sprout hay in your garden?
Leslie


bpbhoo
 

i used one of those under the bed storage containers. about 33x15x6. (around $20) it was pretty low but i cut out part of the front to make it low entry. sha


BenBun'sMom
 

I'm not aware of any cat litter that I'd feel safe using for rabbits ... they tend to have chemical additives for absorption and odor, not sure about rabbit safety.  Horse bedding pellets (soft wood, pine) break down beautifully in my large compost piles (about 2 cu ft each) and bunny fecals are divine soil additives.  I use headless hays so seeds are not a problem but my compost cooks down to black gold and the stuff is garden magic.  If you ever have urine crystallize on your plastic pans remember to soak them in straight vinegar for a few minutes.  Wait before scrubbing, the acid pH dissolves urine residue on its own and saves your scrubbing work.  Isn't it challenging to get the grate truly clean?  Sounds like a lot of scrubbing would be needed to clean the openings -- but then again, soak in vinegar; rinse well.

On Tue, May 18, 2021 at 12:40 PM Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks so much for the suggestions. I’ve always used kitty litter with a grate to keep them from eating it or sitting in wetness. I like knowing when I clean the litter box it’s really clean. How long do pellets last or control the smell? If you compost it, does it not have hay seeds in it that might possibly sprout hay in your garden?
Leslie





Kinenchen
 

I've never had an issue with hay sprouting in my garden and I don't compost it first. Mostly, I get straw mushrooms growing on the horse bedding.

Cat litter, I agree, may be harmful to bunnies' delicate respiratory health and digestive tracts. Between the fine particulate clay and additives, there's a lot to contend with for their little bodies. I especially worry for bunnies who accidentally ingest clays off their paws during grooming or breathe the dust.

Christie Taylor



On Tue, May 18, 2021 at 12:52 PM BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:
I'm not aware of any cat litter that I'd feel safe using for rabbits ... they tend to have chemical additives for absorption and odor, not sure about rabbit safety.  Horse bedding pellets (soft wood, pine) break down beautifully in my large compost piles (about 2 cu ft each) and bunny fecals are divine soil additives.  I use headless hays so seeds are not a problem but my compost cooks down to black gold and the stuff is garden magic.  If you ever have urine crystallize on your plastic pans remember to soak them in straight vinegar for a few minutes.  Wait before scrubbing, the acid pH dissolves urine residue on its own and saves your scrubbing work.  Isn't it challenging to get the grate truly clean?  Sounds like a lot of scrubbing would be needed to clean the openings -- but then again, soak in vinegar; rinse well.

On Tue, May 18, 2021 at 12:40 PM Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks so much for the suggestions. I’ve always used kitty litter with a grate to keep them from eating it or sitting in wetness. I like knowing when I clean the litter box it’s really clean. How long do pellets last or control the smell? If you compost it, does it not have hay seeds in it that might possibly sprout hay in your garden?
Leslie





David L. Fisher
 

I tried cat litter once with my very first bunny, Q-Tip, and he was a bit odd in some respects (he thought rubber bands were chewing gum, as I discovered within 15 minutes of getting him home from the shelter and letting him run around).  He also started munching on the litter itself, so I immediately got rid of it and switched to newspaper with hay on top for his litterbox.

Dave


On 5/19/2021 3:54 PM, Kinenchen wrote:
I've never had an issue with hay sprouting in my garden and I don't compost it first. Mostly, I get straw mushrooms growing on the horse bedding.

Cat litter, I agree, may be harmful to bunnies' delicate respiratory health and digestive tracts. Between the fine particulate clay and additives, there's a lot to contend with for their little bodies. I especially worry for bunnies who accidentally ingest clays off their paws during grooming or breathe the dust.

Christie Taylor



On Tue, May 18, 2021 at 12:52 PM BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:
I'm not aware of any cat litter that I'd feel safe using for rabbits ... they tend to have chemical additives for absorption and odor, not sure about rabbit safety.  Horse bedding pellets (soft wood, pine) break down beautifully in my large compost piles (about 2 cu ft each) and bunny fecals are divine soil additives.  I use headless hays so seeds are not a problem but my compost cooks down to black gold and the stuff is garden magic.  If you ever have urine crystallize on your plastic pans remember to soak them in straight vinegar for a few minutes.  Wait before scrubbing, the acid pH dissolves urine residue on its own and saves your scrubbing work.  Isn't it challenging to get the grate truly clean?  Sounds like a lot of scrubbing would be needed to clean the openings -- but then again, soak in vinegar; rinse well.

On Tue, May 18, 2021 at 12:40 PM Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks so much for the suggestions. I’ve always used kitty litter with a grate to keep them from eating it or sitting in wetness. I like knowing when I clean the litter box it’s really clean. How long do pellets last or control the smell? If you compost it, does it not have hay seeds in it that might possibly sprout hay in your garden?
Leslie





Leslie B
 

Thanks for the suggestions. My bunnies have no contact with the litter. They can’t kick it, stir it up, or get it on their paws. There is a very heavy hardware cloth grate covered in hay between them and the litter. I’ll try some wood stove pellets. How often do those have to be changed?
Thanks,
Leslie


Leslie B
 

I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
Thanks,
Leslie


Meg Brown
 

Hi Leslie
I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.

It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.

This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:

1. Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.

2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
Still I’d change the entire box frequently.

Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.

The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost. Otherwise they are a great choice.

As a bonus:
It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’

But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens... I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
Meg

On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
Thanks,
Leslie




Meg Brown
 

I meant “put 1.5” of wood stove pellets on the bottom”, not newspaper!

On May 20, 2021, at 5:02 PM, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@msn.com> wrote:

Hi Leslie
I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.

It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.

This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:

1. Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.

2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
Still I’d change the entire box frequently.

Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.

The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost. Otherwise they are a great choice.

As a bonus:
It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’

But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens... I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
Meg


On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
Thanks,
Leslie







Kinenchen
 

I usually put 1-2 inches of pellets in the bottom of the bin, put a cookie cooling rack on top of the pellets to keep them from digging and then put some hay in the corner. I change it once a week for my solo bunny and twice a week for my pair. They also share a communal litter box when they're getting exercise time, so that helps. I find the odor control is quite good - I smell the towel I put in front of the bin before I smell the bin itself. I leave everything in there, dump it out in my garden and rake it out to a thin layer. If you have artillery fungus, I recommend placing it further away from your house - it retains moisture very well and artillery fungus loves it.

Christie Taylor



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:04 PM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
I meant “put 1.5” of wood stove pellets on the bottom”, not newspaper!

> On May 20, 2021, at 5:02 PM, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Leslie
>   I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
>       In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
>    Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.   
>
>   It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.
>
>   This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:
>
> 1.  Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.
>
> 2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
>     If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
>   Still I’d change the entire box frequently.
>
>    Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.
>
>   The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
>     I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost.  Otherwise they are a great choice. 
>
> As a bonus:
>      It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
>     That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’
>
>     But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens...  I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
>     Meg
>
>
>> On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
>> Thanks,
>> Leslie
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>






Denise Fischer
 

Put about 2 inches of pellets in the bottom of the litter box. Remove just the poop with your litter scoop since it will be on top and close together. You won't get all of it but do the best that you can, you will also inadvertently pick up some dry pellets. Then scrape the dry top layer off where you know that your bun likes to pee. Scoop up as much of the wet stuff as possible and mix the rest of the pellets together. Over time the pellets will break down to sawdust. Add more pellets as needed and mix in with the existing stuff. I've been doing this for many years and rarely have to completely empty the box. By mixing the contents together after scooping up the soiled pellets you're causing the wet stuff, in parts that you couldn't access, to be absorbed by the dry stuff that remains. Makes great compost. This is the same procedure I've used when I had cats so use that as your guide if you have also had cats. If you don't like pellets you can also use hay; Tractor Supply has chopped hay in a plastic bale which my rabbit didn't like so I ended up using it for bedding and it works well.
Denise

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 4:37 PM Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
Thanks,
Leslie





BenBun'sMom
 

I'm actually shocked to read about putting 1.5 to 2 inch depths of horse bedding pellets (soft wood, biot for stove fuel) in a litter pan and partially cleaning it for extended days.  Perhaps I am the most wasteful rabbit carer, but I prefer to start each rabbit with a totally cleaned litter pan each day ... am I really the only one?  My pan for a 5-6 pound rabbit is about 20x26x7 and I spread a single layer of pellets, about 0.25 9nch deep (1/4 inch, maybe 0.5 cm for the metric folk).  I load the pan with hay. fluffing and filling the entire pan to the top.  This much may also be used for one day by two bonded rabbits.  Each morning the whole thing goes onto the compost pile and breaks down perfectly, sweetly, into garden black gold.  I can't imagine any health or esthetic benefit to starting with a deep and very heavy layer of wood pellets and goiung through the labor of hunting and pecking to remove soiled substrate while most certainly leaving some urine soaked and odorous (and ammonia harboring?) material behind.  Gag, how unsanitary, how unpleasant, and what a load of work!  Yes, I do go through tons of hay, but this is where my rabbits spend a lot of their time so to my mind keeping it fresh and clean is paramount.  Just my 0.02.  BTW been doing this since 2000, since we seem to be needing to supply that datum.

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:43 PM Kinenchen <graemhoek@...> wrote:
I usually put 1-2 inches of pellets in the bottom of the bin, put a cookie cooling rack on top of the pellets to keep them from digging and then put some hay in the corner. I change it once a week for my solo bunny and twice a week for my pair. They also share a communal litter box when they're getting exercise time, so that helps. I find the odor control is quite good - I smell the towel I put in front of the bin before I smell the bin itself. I leave everything in there, dump it out in my garden and rake it out to a thin layer. If you have artillery fungus, I recommend placing it further away from your house - it retains moisture very well and artillery fungus loves it.

Christie Taylor



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:04 PM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
I meant “put 1.5” of wood stove pellets on the bottom”, not newspaper!

> On May 20, 2021, at 5:02 PM, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Leslie
>   I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
>       In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
>    Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.   
>
>   It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.
>
>   This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:
>
> 1.  Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.
>
> 2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
>     If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
>   Still I’d change the entire box frequently.
>
>    Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.
>
>   The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
>     I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost.  Otherwise they are a great choice. 
>
> As a bonus:
>      It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
>     That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’
>
>     But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens...  I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
>     Meg
>
>
>> On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
>> Thanks,
>> Leslie
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>






BenBun'sMom
 

Correction typo, sorry bandaged hand (soft wood, not for stove fuel)

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:36 AM Sharon Lloyd <lloydse@...> wrote:
I'm actually shocked to read about putting 1.5 to 2 inch depths of horse bedding pellets (soft wood, biot for stove fuel) in a litter pan and partially cleaning it for extended days.  Perhaps I am the most wasteful rabbit carer, but I prefer to start each rabbit with a totally cleaned litter pan each day ... am I really the only one?  My pan for a 5-6 pound rabbit is about 20x26x7 and I spread a single layer of pellets, about 0.25 9nch deep (1/4 inch, maybe 0.5 cm for the metric folk).  I load the pan with hay. fluffing and filling the entire pan to the top.  This much may also be used for one day by two bonded rabbits.  Each morning the whole thing goes onto the compost pile and breaks down perfectly, sweetly, into garden black gold.  I can't imagine any health or esthetic benefit to starting with a deep and very heavy layer of wood pellets and goiung through the labor of hunting and pecking to remove soiled substrate while most certainly leaving some urine soaked and odorous (and ammonia harboring?) material behind.  Gag, how unsanitary, how unpleasant, and what a load of work!  Yes, I do go through tons of hay, but this is where my rabbits spend a lot of their time so to my mind keeping it fresh and clean is paramount.  Just my 0.02.  BTW been doing this since 2000, since we seem to be needing to supply that datum.

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:43 PM Kinenchen <graemhoek@...> wrote:
I usually put 1-2 inches of pellets in the bottom of the bin, put a cookie cooling rack on top of the pellets to keep them from digging and then put some hay in the corner. I change it once a week for my solo bunny and twice a week for my pair. They also share a communal litter box when they're getting exercise time, so that helps. I find the odor control is quite good - I smell the towel I put in front of the bin before I smell the bin itself. I leave everything in there, dump it out in my garden and rake it out to a thin layer. If you have artillery fungus, I recommend placing it further away from your house - it retains moisture very well and artillery fungus loves it.

Christie Taylor



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:04 PM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
I meant “put 1.5” of wood stove pellets on the bottom”, not newspaper!

> On May 20, 2021, at 5:02 PM, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Leslie
>   I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
>       In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
>    Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.   
>
>   It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.
>
>   This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:
>
> 1.  Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.
>
> 2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
>     If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
>   Still I’d change the entire box frequently.
>
>    Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.
>
>   The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
>     I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost.  Otherwise they are a great choice. 
>
> As a bonus:
>      It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
>     That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’
>
>     But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens...  I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
>     Meg
>
>
>> On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
>> Thanks,
>> Leslie
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>






christine7654321
 

BenBunsMom--if you put down hay you are right, you really have to change it every day as the hay gets soiled. But if you put hay above, and you aren't having a problem with flies, you can just scoop the urine soaked spot for a couple of days and mix it up. Or maybe that's what most people do because bunny poop seems so benign, doesn't smell, and doesn't seem to get "worse" after a couple of days. But picking the poop out--yeah, that's a LOT of work to save bedding.


On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 7:36 AM BenBun'sMom <lloydse@...> wrote:
I'm actually shocked to read about putting 1.5 to 2 inch depths of horse bedding pellets (soft wood, biot for stove fuel) in a litter pan and partially cleaning it for extended days.  Perhaps I am the most wasteful rabbit carer, but I prefer to start each rabbit with a totally cleaned litter pan each day ... am I really the only one?  My pan for a 5-6 pound rabbit is about 20x26x7 and I spread a single layer of pellets, about 0.25 9nch deep (1/4 inch, maybe 0.5 cm for the metric folk).  I load the pan with hay. fluffing and filling the entire pan to the top.  This much may also be used for one day by two bonded rabbits.  Each morning the whole thing goes onto the compost pile and breaks down perfectly, sweetly, into garden black gold.  I can't imagine any health or esthetic benefit to starting with a deep and very heavy layer of wood pellets and goiung through the labor of hunting and pecking to remove soiled substrate while most certainly leaving some urine soaked and odorous (and ammonia harboring?) material behind.  Gag, how unsanitary, how unpleasant, and what a load of work!  Yes, I do go through tons of hay, but this is where my rabbits spend a lot of their time so to my mind keeping it fresh and clean is paramount.  Just my 0.02.  BTW been doing this since 2000, since we seem to be needing to supply that datum.

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:43 PM Kinenchen <graemhoek@...> wrote:
I usually put 1-2 inches of pellets in the bottom of the bin, put a cookie cooling rack on top of the pellets to keep them from digging and then put some hay in the corner. I change it once a week for my solo bunny and twice a week for my pair. They also share a communal litter box when they're getting exercise time, so that helps. I find the odor control is quite good - I smell the towel I put in front of the bin before I smell the bin itself. I leave everything in there, dump it out in my garden and rake it out to a thin layer. If you have artillery fungus, I recommend placing it further away from your house - it retains moisture very well and artillery fungus loves it.

Christie Taylor



On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 5:04 PM Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
I meant “put 1.5” of wood stove pellets on the bottom”, not newspaper!

> On May 20, 2021, at 5:02 PM, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Leslie
>   I used the wood stove pellets for about 10 years.
>       In the first year, when I was new to bunnies, I didn’t cover the pellets completely with hay.
>    Because of that, my bunny got sore hocks in a short amount of time.   
>
>   It’s important to always make sure that you can’t “see” the pellets, as they break down into an acidic sawdust which is very abrasive to the bunny’s feet.
>
>   This is how is used the pellets for many years before I switched to using newspaper:
>
> 1.  Put appt 1.5” of newspaper evenly on the bottom of the litter box.
>
> 2. Cover with a generous amount of hay.
>     If the hay / pellets get wet, you could possibly scoop out the wet area since you’re using such a large box.
>   Still I’d change the entire box frequently.
>
>    Any time the hay looks soiled/ wet, (even if you can’t see any wood stove pellets), sprinkle fresh hay on top to cover the soiled area, in between changing the box.
>
>   The only reason I stopped using the pellets, which do work really well, is because they get heavy, especially when wet.
>     I have a 3–story house and have had bunnies on all 3 levels, so it’s just easier bringing it up or downstairs and down a hill to the compost.  Otherwise they are a great choice. 
>
> As a bonus:
>      It takes approximately 2 years for my litter, etc. to break down into rich compost, using newspaper or wood stove pellets.
>     That’s without turning it as I have a pile that’s 20’x 30’
>
>     But another organic gardening friend fills his truck with my “bunny gold compost” and uses it widely in his food and flower gardens...  I tell him his garden reminds me of Findhorn!
>     Meg
>
>
>> On May 20, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Leslie B via groups.io <lesliebrassell=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> I’m sorry, but I’m still trying to wrap my head around how the wood pellets work. Do you just leave the poop and pee and hay in there until you change them? I think I need a step by step set of directions on how these work. I got a cement mixing box! Thanks for that tip!
>> Thanks,
>> Leslie
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>