Topics

Meloxicam


Ellen
 

Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


Nancy Ainsworth
 

Hi Ellen,
I'm not sure if meloxicam is available in pill form, but I wonder if Momo loves bananas if you could get a stage 1 baby food bananas and use that in a syringe with the meloxicam to get Momo to take it?
Nancy


-----Original Message-----
From: Ellen via groups.io <houseofhens@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 29, 2020 9:45 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Meloxicam

Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


JG
 

You can certainly get it in a human pill.  brand name Mobic.   (I was doing a lot of meloxicam research lately, as my vet was being incredibly stingy with it)



On 29 Aug 2020, at 08:51, Nancy Ainsworth via groups.io <jtawired@...> wrote:

Hi Ellen,
I'm not sure if meloxicam is available in pill form, but I wonder if Momo loves bananas if you could get a stage 1 baby food bananas and use that in a syringe with the meloxicam to get Momo to take it?
Nancy


-----Original Message-----
From: Ellen via groups.io <houseofhens@...>
To: main@etherbun.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 29, 2020 9:45 am
Subject: [Etherbun Main] Meloxicam

Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


Meg Brown
 

Hi Ellen,
      For several of my bunnies who needed Metacam long-term for arthritis, (but not other meds or fluids, where I’d need to restrain him/ her), I have often put the Metacam on a small piece of cut-up banana.

    I mean the size of a nickel, then cut in tiny pieces.   Most buns have eaten their “banana medicine” enthusiastically licking the little dish to get every drop.

      I have found that this prevents the stress of restraining the bun if Metacam is the only med necessary, especially if it’s to be given long-term.
      Best to you and Momo



Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


tiffanie fisher
 

My buns love their metacam too - slurp it right out.  But If they are sometimes picky, I kneel down, but them between my legs, and then pet them on their head before I slide the tiny syringe between their teeth from the side.  At most my Jack who is 5lbs gets .7ml so I just squeeze it all in quickly.  

In the past with other medications, I’ve taken a banana and just made a narrow hole and filled it with the medication.  Alternatively I used a piece of applie and made little ridges with a knife and then squirted the medicine on the apple and it soaked into the ridges. 

Good luck! 

On Aug 29, 2020, at 10:12, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:


Hi Ellen,
      For several of my bunnies who needed Metacam long-term for arthritis, (but not other meds or fluids, where I’d need to restrain him/ her), I have often put the Metacam on a small piece of cut-up banana.

    I mean the size of a nickel, then cut in tiny pieces.   Most buns have eaten their “banana medicine” enthusiastically licking the little dish to get every drop.

      I have found that this prevents the stress of restraining the bun if Metacam is the only med necessary, especially if it’s to be given long-term.
      Best to you and Momo



Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


Meg Brown
 


  Regarding the Meloxicam in pill form, I was prescribed that when I broke my arm.    I took one dose and felt ill.  My wildlife rehab head vet tech said she could use it for large mammals-not sure which.
    
I can’t remember the strength, (possibly 15mg), but I remember thinking that it wouldn’t be possible to get a correct dose for a rabbit unless I had it compounded.
      
If you did get the pills, I think you’d run into that issue so you’d still have to figure out a way to get the compounded med into Momo.

     Personally, I’d stick with the 1.5mg/ ml strength Metacam and try it on a piece of banana
       Sincerely,
           Meg

On Aug 29, 2020, at 10:33 AM, tiffanie fisher <tiffaniefisher@...> wrote:


My buns love their metacam too - slurp it right out.  But If they are sometimes picky, I kneel down, but them between my legs, and then pet them on their head before I slide the tiny syringe between their teeth from the side.  At most my Jack who is 5lbs gets .7ml so I just squeeze it all in quickly.  

In the past with other medications, I’ve taken a banana and just made a narrow hole and filled it with the medication.  Alternatively I used a piece of applie and made little ridges with a knife and then squirted the medicine on the apple and it soaked into the ridges. 

Good luck! 

On Aug 29, 2020, at 10:12, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:


Hi Ellen,
      For several of my bunnies who needed Metacam long-term for arthritis, (but not other meds or fluids, where I’d need to restrain him/ her), I have often put the Metacam on a small piece of cut-up banana.

    I mean the size of a nickel, then cut in tiny pieces.   Most buns have eaten their “banana medicine” enthusiastically licking the little dish to get every drop.

      I have found that this prevents the stress of restraining the bun if Metacam is the only med necessary, especially if it’s to be given long-term.
      Best to you and Momo



Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


mark
 

That's a good idea. Since banana is usually pretty soft, you could probably mush it a bit and mix in the liquid meloxicam.

Right now I give Polly her meloxicam by syringe. I have to put her on a towel on the counter, hold her head.

So I'm "the bad guy". She usually runs and hides when she sees me grab the towel.
Not how I'd like it to be.

-mark

--
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.


On August 29, 2020 10:12:20 AM EDT, Meg Brown <bustercharlie@...> wrote:
Hi Ellen,
      For several of my bunnies who needed Metacam long-term for arthritis, (but not other meds or fluids, where I’d need to restrain him/ her), I have often put the Metacam on a small piece of cut-up banana.

    I mean the size of a nickel, then cut in tiny pieces.   Most buns have eaten their “banana medicine” enthusiastically licking the little dish to get every drop.

      I have found that this prevents the stress of restraining the bun if Metacam is the only med necessary, especially if it’s to be given long-term.
      Best to you and Momo



Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


David L. Fisher
 

Hi Ellen -

Have you tried mixing the Metacam with banana, so that Momo thinks he's getting a treat instead of medicine?  If you can get him to enjoy the banana as if you're giving him a treat, you can fool him into giving him any meds you have to give.  As for pills, you can crush them up and mix into some banana.  Pills are difficult to chew and very chalky, so a rabbit would likely spit out the part that isn't finely crushed up. 

One technique I had to use when I had a Siberian Dwarf hamster that needed medication - the dose was 0.05 ml, which is smaller than a single drop - so I ended up diluting it 1:1 with water so I could control the dose.  If you end up with pills or doses way too large for a rabbit, you can always dilute them.

Hope this helps

Dave



On 8/29/2020 9:45 AM, Ellen via groups.io wrote:
Hi All!
     My 9 year old boy, Momo, has been put on a meloxicam regimen for his arthritis. Where my old bun, Leroy, would gladly slurp his down (compounded by a local pharmacy in mango flavor!) Momo is very resistant and I was wondering if anyone out there had ever found a dosage in tablet form that could be given (I do have a pill splitter) instead?

   I know....why in the world woud ANYONE in their right mind try to "pill a rabbit".....well, Momo is bananas about BANANAS! I'm pretty confident that a piece of a tablet slipped inside a bit of his morning banana slice would be munched down before you could bat an eye!

   I'm gonna call my local pharmacist and see what tablets/strengths are available, but thought I'd see if anyone had used this form of meloxicam before.

    our best,
       Ellen & Momo
   


Ellen
 

7Hi All!
       I called my pharmacy and they said that the meloxicam in pill format doesn't come in small enough strengths to split the tabs for a rabbit.....he does let me give it to him and will just have to get with the program.....that being, morning eye cleaning (he has a bit of a watery eye that can cause dried up tears at the corners) meloxicam, followed by some hear rubs....and then, his beloved bananas after he gets put back down. He is such a smart little guy and adapts to routines very quickly, so I'm pretty sure he will get on board.

Thanks for all the suggestions though.......I really appreciate everyone's input! If he continues to develop a negative attitude with me, I'll be trying 'em! Here's hoping he just simmers down......

yerz trooly
     Ellen & Momo


motek_and_gozal
 

For tiny dosages like 0.05ml, use an insulin syringe, they are marked every 0.01 ml. You can get them from vet or buy by the 100. I got mine from Alivet. No prescription necessary.

Tal
🐇🐇


Jean Silva
 

After years of giving oral medications to bunnies, I have been playing with asking the rabbits to take the medications voluntarily. That is, stepping up to the syringe, taking it in their mouths and swallowing as I depress the plunger. And I have found that rabbits that struggle as I hold them and lift their lips to insert the syringe, will take the meds when they are free standing.

Weird huh? Make no mistake I have tried lots of methods over the years. Mixing meds in banana, hiding them in mini shredded wheat, or blue berries, pressing the bunny against my body with my forearm while lifting their lips, pinning them between my legs while I kneel on the floor. Sound horrible. Well, when you write it down, it is horrible. Well not the banana stuff. Banana is never horrible.

Anyway, my most recent success is Clyde a white lion head dwarf with an infection behind his eye. I picked him up, put him on a table, did the pin to the body with a fore arm, gave the meds and did lots of petting. Then I decided to change it up. I started with the meloxicam, which most of my bunnies take voluntarily. I just tickled his lips with the syringe while he was free standing on the table. It did this several times until he took the syringe in his mouth. Then I depressed the plunger - about 1/3 of the dose. Waited for him to swallow, and nibble lightly on the syringe before depressing again. I was less certain about SMZ-TMP. But I tried the same method with that med too. Only this time Clyde was "at liberty" in his own space. I had to offer the syringe more times but at last he took the meds on his own. Yesterday when I presented the syringe, he stepped up and took the SMZ-TMP on his own. Huh.

So my big insight. No one likes to be forced to take medications. So, after all these years, I think that one reason that meds seem so unpleasant to bunnies, is not the meds it is he method of delivery. It is being held and compelled to take the meds that is unpleasant and adds to the unpleasantness of strange tastes. So, maybe try offering the meloxicam syringe to your bunny and see if that works. Be persistent but give the bunny time to decide to take the meds on his own.

Just a thought.

Jean Silva


David L. Fisher
 

The last time I had to give Monty medication, I tried a few different approaches and he resisted me - but he only ran off just out of reach.  Out of simple frustration, I said "please" and he let me lie down on the floor next to him and didn't put up any fight at all, and I got the meds in.  I was so used to having to try all kinds of different ways of restraining a bunny if my first attempt (simply try to pull up the side of the mouth and get the syringe in) - what worked better than anything was just being polite about it.

I never would have thought it would work, but I'm a believer now.  :)

Dave

On 9/1/2020 10:53 AM, Jean Silva wrote:
After years of giving oral medications to bunnies, I have been playing with asking the rabbits to take the medications voluntarily. That is, stepping up to the syringe, taking it in their mouths and swallowing as I depress the plunger. And I have found that rabbits that struggle as I hold them and lift their lips to insert the syringe, will take the meds when they are free standing.

Weird huh? Make no mistake I have tried lots of methods over the years. Mixing meds in banana, hiding them in mini shredded wheat, or blue berries, pressing the bunny against my body with my forearm while lifting their lips, pinning them between my legs while I kneel on the floor. Sound horrible. Well, when you write it down, it is horrible. Well not the banana stuff. Banana is never horrible.

Anyway, my most recent success is Clyde a white lion head dwarf with an infection behind his eye. I picked him up, put him on a table, did the pin to the body with a fore arm, gave the meds and did lots of petting. Then I decided to change it up. I started with the meloxicam, which most of my bunnies take voluntarily. I just tickled his lips with the syringe while he was free standing on the table. It did this several times until he took the syringe in his mouth. Then I depressed the plunger - about 1/3 of the dose. Waited for him to swallow, and nibble lightly on the syringe before depressing again. I was less certain about SMZ-TMP. But I tried the same method with that med too. Only this time Clyde was "at liberty" in his own space. I had to offer the syringe more times but at last he took the meds on his own. Yesterday when I presented the syringe, he stepped up and took the SMZ-TMP on his own. Huh.

So my big insight. No one likes to be forced to take medications. So, after all these years, I think that one reason that meds seem so unpleasant to bunnies, is not the meds it is he method of delivery. It is being held and compelled to take the meds that is unpleasant and adds to the unpleasantness of strange tastes. So, maybe try offering the meloxicam syringe to your bunny and see if that works. Be persistent but give the bunny time to decide to take the meds on his own.

Just a thought.

Jean Silva




Ellen
 

Hi All,
 
       I remember someone saying that they would talk to their bunny about things that needed to b done.....like nail clips....and they started a few days before with "we're gonna need to trim your nails in a in fill-in-the-blank days"....and each day they would count down to the day. Then on the day of clipping, their bunny would behave beautifully for the event.

  The first time I syringed the meloxicam to him, he was on the floor and took it like an angel and I thought it was gonna be easy street from then on.......nope!

  So I started to explain the routine to Momo....."okay buddy, we're gonna clean your eyes up and then I'm gonna give you your medicine and after that, it's banana time! That's how it's gonna work from now on". I've been saying that for the last couple of days and he seems to be onboard. I used to clean his eyes with him on the floor (he has cataracts and doesn't have a bondmate to help him keep 'em clean) then put him in my lap for the meloxicam, then back on the floor for bananas. He is so smart about routines and comes to expect regularity that I thought telling him about the whole process would help get my idea/intentions across....seems to have worked so far!

  So Jean & Dave, I totally agree! Respect and politeness can and should be used way before resorting to trickery!

nosebonks,
    Ellen & Momo


Alison McFarland
 

Some of my buns will take meloxicam willingly, and one even considers it his favorite treat. He will thump if we are late with it.

Two bunnies are recalcitrant. But otherwise it does work.

Alison

On Sep 1, 2020, at 8:11 PM, David L. Fisher <dlf@...> wrote:

The last time I had to give Monty medication, I tried a few different approaches and he resisted me - but he only ran off just out of reach. Out of simple frustration, I said "please" and he let me lie down on the floor next to him and didn't put up any fight at all, and I got the meds in. I was so used to having to try all kinds of different ways of restraining a bunny if my first attempt (simply try to pull up the side of the mouth and get the syringe in) - what worked better than anything was just being polite about it.

I never would have thought it would work, but I'm a believer now. :)

Dave



On 9/1/2020 10:53 AM, Jean Silva wrote:
After years of giving oral medications to bunnies, I have been playing with asking the rabbits to take the medications voluntarily. That is, stepping up to the syringe, taking it in their mouths and swallowing as I depress the plunger. And I have found that rabbits that struggle as I hold them and lift their lips to insert the syringe, will take the meds when they are free standing.

Weird huh? Make no mistake I have tried lots of methods over the years. Mixing meds in banana, hiding them in mini shredded wheat, or blue berries, pressing the bunny against my body with my forearm while lifting their lips, pinning them between my legs while I kneel on the floor. Sound horrible. Well, when you write it down, it is horrible. Well not the banana stuff. Banana is never horrible.

Anyway, my most recent success is Clyde a white lion head dwarf with an infection behind his eye. I picked him up, put him on a table, did the pin to the body with a fore arm, gave the meds and did lots of petting. Then I decided to change it up. I started with the meloxicam, which most of my bunnies take voluntarily. I just tickled his lips with the syringe while he was free standing on the table. It did this several times until he took the syringe in his mouth. Then I depressed the plunger - about 1/3 of the dose. Waited for him to swallow, and nibble lightly on the syringe before depressing again. I was less certain about SMZ-TMP. But I tried the same method with that med too. Only this time Clyde was "at liberty" in his own space. I had to offer the syringe more times but at last he took the meds on his own. Yesterday when I presented the syringe, he stepped up and took the SMZ-TMP on his own. Huh.

So my big insight. No one likes to be forced to take medications. So, after all these years, I think that one reason that meds seem so unpleasant to bunnies, is not the meds it is he method of delivery. It is being held and compelled to take the meds that is unpleasant and adds to the unpleasantness of strange tastes. So, maybe try offering the meloxicam syringe to your bunny and see if that works. Be persistent but give the bunny time to decide to take the meds on his own.

Just a thought.

Jean Silva





David L. Fisher
 

You might be remembering me when I have to travel, and I have to start telling my bunnies a couple weeks in advance that the day is approaching, especially so Monty doesn't think I am surrendering him.  Also, once there, the folks where he is boarded also tell him how many meals until I return, and they insist that Monty understands the countdown (or perhaps he just waits for the count to get to "one meal left and then you get to go home".

Dave


On 9/2/2020 9:30 AM, Ellen via groups.io wrote:
Hi All,
 
       I remember someone saying that they would talk to their bunny about things that needed to b done.....like nail clips....and they started a few days before with "we're gonna need to trim your nails in a in fill-in-the-blank days"....and each day they would count down to the day. Then on the day of clipping, their bunny would behave beautifully for the event.

  The first time I syringed the meloxicam to him, he was on the floor and took it like an angel and I thought it was gonna be easy street from then on.......nope!

  So I started to explain the routine to Momo....."okay buddy, we're gonna clean your eyes up and then I'm gonna give you your medicine and after that, it's banana time! That's how it's gonna work from now on". I've been saying that for the last couple of days and he seems to be onboard. I used to clean his eyes with him on the floor (he has cataracts and doesn't have a bondmate to help him keep 'em clean) then put him in my lap for the meloxicam, then back on the floor for bananas. He is so smart about routines and comes to expect regularity that I thought telling him about the whole process would help get my idea/intentions across....seems to have worked so far!

  So Jean & Dave, I totally agree! Respect and politeness can and should be used way before resorting to trickery!

nosebonks,
    Ellen & Momo


Ellen
 

Dave! I believe that post of yours is the one I was thinking of! And I believe most of us, bunnies included, respond to a calm voice of reason. Works for me!


David L. Fisher
 

In July 2016, my brother called to tell me that my father was only hours away from being gone, so I left work and basically barged into the house and announced "come on guys, I have to get you to the rescue and go back to MA".  Monty handled it well and just went into his carrier, but Tidbit was new and she tried to get away from me - when I picked her up she actually screamed (from fear) - but they went together, in separate carriers, and that probably helped both of them to not take it personally.

Tidbit was a direct rescue (off the street) and after a failed bonding attempt, she got adopted out.  In February 2018, my brother called to tell me my mother was only a couple days away from being gone, and this time I just went numb.  With no explanation, I brought Monty to the rescue and I know he could feel my heartbreak, and I think he took it personally (like I was returning him).  He stopped eating and spent 5 days in the hospital.  Once I got back, he went back to normal almost immediately, and I started asking him why the whole ordeal went so badly - and he was very responsive to keywords, especially like "are you happy to be home?"

From all of this, I did learn that even if they don't understand all the grammatical constructs, they do learn the keywords and associate them with events.  A reassuring voice and the right words really do help them understand what's happening.

On a different note, I am about to find out how the newest direct rescue, named Drillbit, will accept his meds after a successful neuter - he just got home a little while ago so tonight I'll discover how well he handles the syringe.

Dave


On 9/2/2020 4:18 PM, Ellen via groups.io wrote:
Dave! I believe that post of yours is the one I was thinking of! And I believe most of us, bunnies included, respond to a calm voice of reason. Works for me!


Christine J. Cox
 

I strongly agree with the gentle approach, and talking my buns through everything.  Zyler has always been a very good bun to work with, but I’ve never strong-armed him into anything.  Several years ago, we got in the habit of morning foot checks.  He has sore hocks, which I have been treating on nearly a daily basis with collasate (to little effect – separate topic).  This involves holding him in my lap, applying the collasate, and letting it dry before releasing him.  I always talk to him about and through the process.  As it dries, I pat him, rub his belly, and tell him what a good boy he is.  He gets “treats” after each session, his favorite timothy cubes.  Animals love routine, and he often reminds me of our session, waiting by the chair in the morning.  He’s very cooperative and knows there will be a good outcome.  I suspect his cooperation is motivated by more than just the treat at the end – it’s a little bonding session we have that he can count on, even on my busiest days.  I’ve realized that building any kind of routine like this provides a beneficial and recognizable process that can be used later to trim nails, administer meds, or even do a body check.  As he ages into his later years, it is reassuring to have a process in place so there will be no struggles should a new treatment be required.  If a bun only experiences being held or contained when it’s something unpleasant, he will remain resistant even when it’s not.  We’ve had some very easy nail trims since adopting this routine.

 

Christine & Zyler