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Rabbit only eating greens


Laura
 

I'm writing to see if someone could give me advice, as I've been struggling with an issue with my rabbit for the past 3 weeks. 

 

All of a sudden he's stopped wanting to eat hay or go in his litter box, and is no longer excited for his treat or pellets. He is eating about a quarter of pellets of what he used to. On the other hand, he goes crazy for his greens more than ever before. He is also eating newspaper.

 

He's been back and forth from the vet for the past two weeks, at times having stayed for 6 days with no conclusive evidence of any sort of physical health issue. There are no issues with his teeth (he was sedated to take a look), his bloodwork is normal, as were his x-rays. He is bright and alert, albeit lazy at the age of 9 1/2.

 

Currently we have him on meds including: stool softener once a day, reglan twice a day as well as an appetite stimulant. He is being closely monitored by our vet. He is producing fecal pellets that vary in size, and we do not believe it is a stasis issue currently, even though he's had that multiple times in the past. 

 

We've tried him on a variety of hay and pellets to see if he would be interested in something different. We are not sure what the shift in behavior is attributed to, but are now convinced that it must be behavioral. 

 

If anyone has experienced this in the past, or could offer some suggestions as to how to get him to eat again, that would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you.


conejolover
 

I may be way off but is he hot? My bunny was having behavioral issues, took him to the vet, started treating him for ec etc turns out his room was too hot, once I put a fan in his room he went literally right back to normal. Just a thought! Hopefully you figure it out!


On Sun, Aug 30, 2020, 4:27 PM Laura via groups.io <Magnolia14=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I'm writing to see if someone could give me advice, as I've been struggling with an issue with my rabbit for the past 3 weeks. 

 

All of a sudden he's stopped wanting to eat hay or go in his litter box, and is no longer excited for his treat or pellets. He is eating about a quarter of pellets of what he used to. On the other hand, he goes crazy for his greens more than ever before. He is also eating newspaper.

 

He's been back and forth from the vet for the past two weeks, at times having stayed for 6 days with no conclusive evidence of any sort of physical health issue. There are no issues with his teeth (he was sedated to take a look), his bloodwork is normal, as were his x-rays. He is bright and alert, albeit lazy at the age of 9 1/2.

 

Currently we have him on meds including: stool softener once a day, reglan twice a day as well as an appetite stimulant. He is being closely monitored by our vet. He is producing fecal pellets that vary in size, and we do not believe it is a stasis issue currently, even though he's had that multiple times in the past. 

 

We've tried him on a variety of hay and pellets to see if he would be interested in something different. We are not sure what the shift in behavior is attributed to, but are now convinced that it must be behavioral. 

 

If anyone has experienced this in the past, or could offer some suggestions as to how to get him to eat again, that would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you.


Meg Brown
 

Hi Laura,
    About 15 years ago, a volunteer at a local shelter told me of a Jersey Wooley with similar symptoms.  He was also active and ripping/eating Newspaper, eating greens, but no pellets.

The shelter’s vet looked at his teeth and said they were fine.
      My friend, the volunteer, brought him to a local HRS recommended vet who said that his teeth were “beautiful”, yet he still wasn’t eating pellets or hay.
     He exhibited the classic signs of a dental issue: alert and hungry, yet selective or no eating.

I offered to adopt him so that I could give him supportive care (which he wasn’t getting at the shelter)

   
My vet was away at a veterinary conference.
When she returned, she examined him and immediately saw that he had a molar spur which had, by that time, cut into his tongue.

It took another five days of syringe feeding before J.Wooly ate on his own (a total of 18 days since he first went to the shelter)

   After that, he needed that one tooth filed every 4-5 months until he passed, several years later.

    I realize you said that your boy had his teeth checked, but his story reminds me so much of my guy’s in terms of his behavior.

  If you’re not completely comfortable with your vet’s dentistry skills, I wonder if it might be worth having his teeth checked again.
       Sincerely,
          Meg


On Aug 30, 2020, at 4:27 PM, Laura via groups.io <Magnolia14@...> wrote:



I'm writing to see if someone could give me advice, as I've been struggling with an issue with my rabbit for the past 3 weeks. 

 

All of a sudden he's stopped wanting to eat hay or go in his litter box, and is no longer excited for his treat or pellets. He is eating about a quarter of pellets of what he used to. On the other hand, he goes crazy for his greens more than ever before. He is also eating newspaper.

 

He's been back and forth from the vet for the past two weeks, at times having stayed for 6 days with no conclusive evidence of any sort of physical health issue. There are no issues with his teeth (he was sedated to take a look), his bloodwork is normal, as were his x-rays. He is bright and alert, albeit lazy at the age of 9 1/2.

 

Currently we have him on meds including: stool softener once a day, reglan twice a day as well as an appetite stimulant. He is being closely monitored by our vet. He is producing fecal pellets that vary in size, and we do not believe it is a stasis issue currently, even though he's had that multiple times in the past. 

 

We've tried him on a variety of hay and pellets to see if he would be interested in something different. We are not sure what the shift in behavior is attributed to, but are now convinced that it must be behavioral. 

 

If anyone has experienced this in the past, or could offer some suggestions as to how to get him to eat again, that would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you.


Laura
 

We keep the air conditioner for him all the time, so I do not believe it's that. But thank you.


Laura
 

Thanks, Meg. That does sound like our rabbit, but I am pretty confident in our vet's dentistry skills, but who knows. The thing is he is eating some hay and some pellets now, but not nearly enough. Also, he chews on his sticks. It might be worth checking again either way.
Thank you for your help.


christine7654321
 

In the mean time, do you have any bunny safe wild greens he can eat in your area? These have much more fiber than supermarket greens. In Virginia we still have plantain and wild grasses. 

On Aug 30, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Laura via groups.io <Magnolia14@...> wrote:

I'm writing to see if someone could give me advice, as I've been struggling with an issue with my rabbit for the past 3 weeks. 

 

All of a sudden he's stopped wanting to eat hay or go in his litter box, and is no longer excited for his treat or pellets. He is eating about a quarter of pellets of what he used to. On the other hand, he goes crazy for his greens more than ever before. He is also eating newspaper.

 

He's been back and forth from the vet for the past two weeks, at times having stayed for 6 days with no conclusive evidence of any sort of physical health issue. There are no issues with his teeth (he was sedated to take a look), his bloodwork is normal, as were his x-rays. He is bright and alert, albeit lazy at the age of 9 1/2.

 

Currently we have him on meds including: stool softener once a day, reglan twice a day as well as an appetite stimulant. He is being closely monitored by our vet. He is producing fecal pellets that vary in size, and we do not believe it is a stasis issue currently, even though he's had that multiple times in the past. 

 

We've tried him on a variety of hay and pellets to see if he would be interested in something different. We are not sure what the shift in behavior is attributed to, but are now convinced that it must be behavioral. 

 

If anyone has experienced this in the past, or could offer some suggestions as to how to get him to eat again, that would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you.


Laura
 

I might be able to find some wild greens... are you talking about common plantain? And how do I know which grasses are ok to eat (given that I know they are not treated)?


christine7654321
 

Broad or flat plantains are both fine. Not sure if they are called "common." I tried to research grasses and as far as I could see, true grasses are safe, but I'd confirm. My buns don't care for grasses really. I can also confirm these are safe: dandelion, curly doc, wild lettuce, willow, blackberry leaves, untreated roses (including stems and flowers), maple leaves, apple leaves and twigs, wild strawberry.


On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 2:42 PM Laura via groups.io <Magnolia14=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might be able to find some wild greens... are you talking about common plantain? And how do I know which grasses are ok to eat (given that I know they are not treated)?


BenBun'sMom
 

Nice list but I would discourage the dock leaves simply because they might be problematic to a rabbit with a tendency to oxalic stones. 

For anyone curious to learn, there are some fabulous references in print; a few of my favorites ...

Matthew Wood's The Book of Herbal Wisdom, although a drawback to his incredible scientific expertise is that he tends to delve into about 25 pages per herb ... a bit 'too much info' for practical use.

Lucile Moore's Rabbit Nutrition and Nutritional Healing is great because it is focused specifically on the rabbit, herbs appropriate and not to rabbits.

IMO the bible of all times for herbs for all reasons for all animals comes from Juliette de Bairacli Levy, and for rabbits I'd refer to her Complete Herbal handbook for Farm and Stable. 

And another gem, quite well compiled/composed for a newbie, All You Ever Wanted to Know About Herbs for Pets by Wulff-Tilford (Mr. & Mrs.)  Full of useful benefits and cautions, color photos so you can hardly make a wrong choice (better than drawings IMO)

Randy Kidd, DVM, has great knowledge but unfortunately his current books in print are specific to cats and dogs.  You might search in herb journals for articles he's written through the years about wild herbs beneficial to rabbits. 

Hope this helps anyone curious about the topic to explore.


On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 3:04 PM christine7654321 <christine7654@...> wrote:
Broad or flat plantains are both fine. Not sure if they are called "common." I tried to research grasses and as far as I could see, true grasses are safe, but I'd confirm. My buns don't care for grasses really. I can also confirm these are safe: dandelion, curly doc, wild lettuce, willow, blackberry leaves, untreated roses (including stems and flowers), maple leaves, apple leaves and twigs, wild strawberry.

On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 2:42 PM Laura via groups.io <Magnolia14=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I might be able to find some wild greens... are you talking about common plantain? And how do I know which grasses are ok to eat (given that I know they are not treated)?


wendyandrayzer
 

I highly recommend a Facebook page called Wild Nutrition & Foraging for Pet Rabbits.  Members take pix of plants and submit them, and the moderator (extremely knowledgeable!) identifies them and says whether they're safe to feed.  I've become an expert forager!


BenBun'sMom
 

Thanks for this, looks like a tremendous resource!


On Tue, Sep 1, 2020 at 12:42 PM wendyandrayzer via groups.io <wendyandrayzer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I highly recommend a Facebook page called Wild Nutrition & Foraging for Pet Rabbits.  Members take pix of plants and submit them, and the moderator (extremely knowledgeable!) identifies them and says whether they're safe to feed.  I've become an expert forager!